Accident and Incident Policy

Policy Statement

Great care is taken by the staff and volunteers at Play Inclusion Project to prevent any injury to children, young people, volunteers or staff.  It is a legal requirement to have a member of staff with a current First Aid qualification working, at all times.  Play Inclusion Project follows the guidelines of the Reporting Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences for the reporting of accidents and incidents.  Safeguarding issues and behaviours between children and young people are not regarded as incidents and there are separate procedures for these.

In the event of an accident:

  • Reassure the child and assess the situation regarding first aid and care for other children. Take appropriate action, e.g. telephone for help, request a first aider.
  • Qualified person to administer first aid (if necessary).
  • Appropriate PPE should be worn when administering first aid.  As a distance of 2m cannot be maintained a face mask and visor should be worn in addition to disposable gloves and apron.
  • Assess the injury and decide on further action.  If necessary, contact the child’s parents/carers and inform them of what has happened.
  • If the injury is not serious enough to consult the hospital, complete an accident and/or incident form as soon as possible. This should also be signed by a witness and parent/carer on collection of their child.

If a child’s injury requires immediate medical attention:

  • Dial 999 and explain the situation calmly and clearly giving the exact location and building details.
  • One member of staff (usually 2nd in command) should accompany the child in the ambulance along with paramedics.
  • The Activity Coordinator should contact the child’s parents and request that they go immediately to the hospital and meet their child there. (PARENTS SHOULD NOT COME TO THE SITE AS THIS WASTES VALUABLE TIME).
  • The Activity Coordinator should then complete an accident form ASAP ensuring information, times and injuries are documented signed and witnessed.

Reporting Serious Accidents/injuries

Reporting accidents and ill health at work is a legal requirement. The information enables the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) and local authorities, to identify where and how risks arise, and to investigate serious accidents. They can then help provide advice on how to reduce injury, and ill health in your workplace.

  • If major injury/death or over-three-day injury has occurred then it is a legal requirement to report the accident/incident to RIDDOR (Reporting Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995)
  • Reports to RIDDOR can be made by the Charity Manager or the employee themselves by completing the online form.
  • A copy of the information reported to RIDDOR will be sent to the employers regardless of who has submitted the report.

For most businesses, a reportable accident, dangerous occurrence, or case of disease is a comparatively rare event, but it does occasionally happen and must be reported.

Administration of Medication Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project believes that the wellbeing of the children and young people who attend our activities to be paramount.  We recognise that due to the complex medical needs of the children and young people we support that some children and young people may need to take prescription medication during their time with Play Inclusion Project.  Play Inclusion Project will ensure that there is always a member of staff either trained or willing to administer medication at each session.

Administration of Medication

A Medication Form must be completed and signed by the parent/carer for every child that attends an activity. This includes children who do not require any medication during the day or at all.

Medication can only be accepted for children with an on-going non-infectious medical condition, where a course of medication is being completed, or medication is required to be taken on a long-term daily basis.

A handover of medication form must be completed each day that medication is brought to a session and the following must be recorded:

  • Child’s name
  • Child’s DOB
  • Name of medication
  • Strength
  • Dosage
  • Time of last dose
  • Date medication was dispensed
  • Period prescribed for

All medication should be brought in original packaging confirming child’s name dosage and frequency.

The Activity Coordinator will store medication away from the children and ensure they are locked away.

The Activity Coordinator will always check the child’s care plan, medication form, handover of medication form and packaging to ensure that the correct dose is administered.

Medication will only be administered if:

  • There is a member of staff present who is willing to do so
  • The appropriate medication form and handover of medication form has been completed
  • the medication is supplied by the parent in the original packaging
  • the child’s name is visible on the packaging
  • the medication is ‘in date’
  • the dose does not exceed manufacturers dosage instructions
  • only one dose will be given on any one day

Medication must be administered in a separate room, away from the rest of the group whenever possible.

Only one child/young person is to be given medication at any time

Procedure

  1. Medication must be administered in a separate room, away from the rest of the group whenever possible.

Only one child/young person is to be given medication at any time

  1. Every time medication is administered, the Activity Coordinator will enter onto an Administration of Medication form the following:
    • the name of the medication administered
    • the dosage
    • time given

This will then be checked by the Second in Command.

  1. Only after the Administration of Medication Form has been completed and the medication has been thoroughly checked by the Activity Coordinator and the Second in Command should medication be administered.  After administering medication, the the Administration of Medication Form must be signed and dated by the person administering the medication and the person who witnessed the medication being given.
  2. If a child’s own support worker/direct payment worker is in attendance:
  • The direct payment worker will be responsible for the administration of any medication.
  • A second person will sign as witness.
  1. When correct procedures are followed, staff will not be responsible for any complications as a result of the medication administered.
  2. If a child refuses to take medication, staff will not force them to do so but will record it on the administration of Medication form.  Parents will be informed of the refusal on collection of their child.

 

Rescue Medication

If a child has a seizure, the Supervisor will follow the details contained in the child’s care plan and time the length of the seizure.

Play Inclusion Project staff have been trained to administer Buccal Midazolam.  The medication will be administered into the buccal cavity and rubbed in through the cheek, with half being administered on one side of the mouth and half on the other.

If a child or young person is having a seizure, rescue medication will be administered at 5 minutes and an ambulance will be called.

As with all medication the child’s name must be on the box/packaging and the paper seal must not be broken.  The above procedure for administering medication will be followed.

NO MEDICATION WILL BE ADMINISTERED WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN CONSENT OF PARENTS/CARERS

Admissions Policy

Policy Statement 

Play Inclusion Project aims to ensure that all sections of the community have access to the activities and projects we deliver through open, fair and clearly communicated procedures.  Play Inclusion Project will not discriminate against children/young people or their families for reasons of race, colour, ethnic origins, culture, gender or gender assignment, marital status, disability, offending background, class, sexual orientation, age, political or religious beliefs.

Admissions Procedure

The activities we deliver are open to 6 – 25year olds with additional needs and disabilities.

An open referral system is in place whereby anyone can refer a child or young person to access the activities we deliver.  However, the funding criteria for each activity differs as follows:

Blackpool Activity Club

To access Blackpool Activity Club the child must be aged 8-18 years old living in Blackpool and have an additional need and/or disability.

Fylde Youth Club

To access Kilgrimol Youth Club the child must be aged 8-18 years old living in Fylde and have an additional need and/or disability.

Transition Social Group

Transition Social Group is for young people aged 18-25 living in Blackpool, Fylde or Wyre with an additional need and/or disability.

Lancashire Break Time

  • To access Lancashire Break Time weekly activities the child/young person must be 6-18 years old, living in Lancashire and be non-assessed, that is not in receipt of a social care package.
  • To access Lancashire Break Time weekly activities the child/young person must be 8-18 years old, living in Lancashire and be non-assessed, that is not in receipt of a social care package.
  • For weekly groups once a place has been offered, that place is secure until the young person reaches the cut off age or no longer requires the place.

Activity Club Booking Procedure

  • Invite letters are sent to parents/carers prior to each activity club inviting their child to attend. Details of activities on offer, dates, times and cost are included in the letters along with a booking form.
  • Places may then be requested during the allocated dates outlined on the letter.
  • Activity Club Coordinators will then allocate sessions and inform parents/carers of sessions their child has received.
  • Invoices will then be sent via email to parents/carers for sessions their child has received
  • Parents/Carers are then required to send their booking form, medication form and payment to secure the sessions.
  • Sessions are not secured until payment has been received.
  • Running days are subject to change as they are dependent on funding.

Prior to a child/young person attending an activity, Play Inclusion Project must have the following information:

  • Emergency contact numbers
  • Medical information including any medication taken at home or required during the day
  • Completed care plan with details of likes, dislikes, behaviour etc
  • Swimming consent form (where appropriate)
  • Consent form
  • Social Media Consent form

Arrival and Departure Policy

Children and young people must be brought to sessions by a member of their household.

    • Children/young people should not car share with anyone outside of their household or social bubbles.
    • One member of staff will be at the door to greet children and staff to minimise the number of people touching the door handle, key fobs etc.
    • Parents/Carers will be expected to stay at least 2 metres away from the entrance.
    • All staff and children will be required to sanitise their hands upon entering the building.
    • Anyone wearing a face covering to travel to the session must remove it in line with procedure:
    1. Wash hands on arrival at the setting
    2. disposable face coverings should be placed in a lidded bin, reusable coverings should be placed in a plastic bag and stored by the individual it belongs to.
    3. Hands must be washed for 20 seconds with soap and water following removal of a face covering
    • Activity Coordinators will record each child/young person’s arrival on the attendance sheet at the start of each session.
    • Medication will be signed in by the Activity Coordinator, parents will not be required to sign as they are unable to enter the building. All medication should come in the original packaging with label detailing name of child, medication, dosage and frequency.
    • Staff will not be required to sign in and out at present, this will be recorded by the Activity Coordinator.
    • Care plans must be completed if one has not already been done so.
    • Prior to attendance parents/carers must provide up to date contact numbers and agree to remain contactable throughout the session in the event their child develops symptoms of COVID-19 and requires collection.
    • All lunch boxes and drinks should be clearly marked with the child’s name.  Children and young people will be responsible, with support, for putting their own belongings in the appropriate place.
    • Support staff should be aware of the child that they are working with each day and their individual needs. They must also be ready to greet them on their arrival.
    • Activity Coordinators should ensure that staff and volunteers have read the care plan for the children they are supporting each day.
    • No child will be allowed to leave the premises with an unauthorised person.
    • Activity Coordinators will record each child/young person’s departure on the attendance sheet once they have been collected, any medication that is being returned must be signed out by the Activity Coordinator.

    No-one displaying symptoms of COVID-19 or who have tested positive in the past 10 days can attend a session.

    No-one can attend a session if a member of their household is displaying symptoms of COVID-1

Attendance Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project delivers Activity Clubs during school holidays and weekly activities in Blackpool, Preston, Fylde and Wyre for children and young people with additional needs and disabilities.  Individual support needs are met by support staff and volunteers.

Prior to a child or young person attending an activity, Play Inclusion Project must have the following:

  • Emergency contact numbers
  • Medical information including any medication taken at home or during the day
  • Completed care plan and consent form
  • Equal opportunities monitoring form
  • Swimming consent form
  • Social media consent form

All activities will be invoiced for, in advance and are non-refundable.

COVID-19

  • Children and young people wishing to attend our activities will be placed in a social bubble with no more than 5 other children and young people and 6 staff.
  • Wherever possible the same group of staff will work with the same social bubble of children and young people.
  • Sessions on offer will be determined by Activity Coordinators and parents will be informed as soon as possible.
  • Children will not be able to attend on days they have not been allocated, they can only attend with their social bubble.

Non-attendance Procedure

  • Parents/carers must inform the Activity Coordinator if their child is unable to attend as soon as possible.
  • If a child/young person has not arrived after 30 minutes and parents have not contacted to explain their absence, the Activity Coordinator should contact the office to check if a message has been left. If no message has been received at the office the Activity Coordinator should contact parents/carers to find out why the child or young person has not arrived.  If there is no answer a message should be left asking parents/carers to contact you.
  • If at the end of the session, there has still been no contact from the absent child’s/young person’s parents/carers, the Activity Coordinator should telephone again before leaving the premises.
  • If the absent child/young person fails to attend their next session and you still have not received contact from parents/carers, the Activity Coordinator should again try to make contact via telephone. If there is still no reply, contact the child’s emergency contact number.  If there is still no explanation for the child’s/young person’s absence and you have concerns as to the child’s/young person’s welfare, follow the safeguarding procedure outlined in the safeguarding policy.

Anti-Bullying Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project is committed to providing a caring, supportive and friendly environment where children and young people learn to value and respect each other and are challenged to reach their full potential through active participation. All staff and volunteers have a responsibility to contribute in whatever way they can to promote and protect such an environment.

Play Inclusion Project also:

  • Respects every child and young person’s need for, and rights to, an environment where safety, security, praise, recognition and opportunity for taking responsibility are available
  • Respects every individual’s feelings and views
  • Recognises that everyone is important and that our differences make us special
  • Shows appreciation of others by acknowledging individual qualities, contributions and progress

Definition

Bullying is the use of aggression with the intention of hurting another person. It is an abuse of power that results in pain and distress to the victim.  Bullying can be:

  • Emotional – being unfriendly, excluding (emotionally and physically) sending hurtful text messages, tormenting, (e.g. hiding belongings, threatening gestures)
  • Physical – pushing, kicking, hitting, punching or any use of violence
  • Sexual – unwanted physical contact or sexually abusive comments
  • Discrimination – racial taunts, graffiti, gestures, homophobic comments, jokes about someone’s disability, sexist comments
  •  Verbal – name-calling, sarcasm, spreading rumours, teasing
  • Cyber bullying – using online spaces to spread rumours about someone or exclude them. It can also include text messaging, including video and picture messaging. Discrimination is often driven by a lack of understanding which only serves to strengthen stereotypes and can potentially lead to actions that may cause women, ethnic minorities, people with disabilities, lesbian, gay, bisexual or transgender people, or people who follow specific religions or beliefs, to feel excluded, isolated or undervalued.

Signs and Indicators

A child may indicate by signs or behaviour that he or she is being bullied. Adults should be aware of these possible signs and that they should investigate if a child:

  • says he or she is being bullied
  • is unwilling to go to sessions
  • becomes withdrawn anxious, or lacking in confidence
  • feels ill before sessions
  • comes home with clothes torn or belongings damaged
  • has possessions go “missing”
  • asks for money or starts stealing money (to pay the bully)
  • has unexplained cuts or bruises
  • is frightened to say what’s wrong
  • gives improbable excuses for any of the above.
  • starts stammering
  • cries themselves to sleep at night or has nightmares
  • becomes aggressive, disruptive or unreasonable
  • is bullying other children or siblings
  • stopping eating
  • attempting or threatening suicide or running away.

These signs and behaviours may indicate other problems, but bullying should be considered a possibility and should be investigated.

Bullying as a Result of any Form of Discrimination

Bullying because of discrimination occurs when bullying is motivated by a prejudice against certain people or groups of people. This may be because of their gender, age, race, nationality, ethnic origin, religion or belief, sexual orientation, gender reassignment, disability or ability.

Generally, these forms of bullying look like other sorts of bullying, but in particular it can include:

  • Verbal abuse – derogatory remarks about girls or women, suggesting girls and women are inferior to boys and men, or that black, Asian and ethnic minority people are not as capable as white people; spreading rumours that someone is gay, suggesting that something or someone is inferior and so they are “gay” – for example, “you’re such a gay boy!” or “those trainers are so gay!” Ridiculing someone because of a disability or mental health related issue
  • Physical abuse – including hitting, punching, kicking, sexual assault, and threatening behaviour

Racist and Religious Bullying

Racist bullying can be defined as ‘A range of hurtful behaviour, both physical and psychological, that makes a person feel unwelcome, marginalised, excluded, powerless or worthless because of their colour, ethnicity, culture, faith community, national origin or national status’.

No young person should be made to feel inferior because of their background, culture or religion. Forms of racism which are the result of ignorance are nevertheless hurtful to the recipient and other members of that group. It is vital that all young people are valued and learn to respect others. Adults should make their stance on racist behaviour clear to all young people so as to discourage racist behaviour and to encourage reporting if it does take place.

Under the Race Relations (Amendment) Act 2000, all public bodies have a duty to eliminate discrimination, promote equality of opportunity and promote good race relations. Tackling racist bullying is a key part of fulfilling this duty.

Sexual, Sexist and Transphobic Bullying

Sexual bullying includes any behaviour, whether physical or non-physical, where sexuality is used as a weapon by boys or by girls. It can be carried out to a person’s face, behind their back or by use of technology. Sexist bullying refers to bullying simply because the victim is a girl or a boy, based on singling out something specifically gender linked.

Transphobic bullying refers to bullying because someone is, or is thought to be, transgender. While young people may express an acceptance of sexual/sexist or transphobic insults because they are widely used, such insults are often used to bully someone.

Inappropriate touching can also be a form of bullying or harassment and may escalate into abuse. Similarly, ‘jokes’ about sexual assault, or rape, if unchallenged, can create an atmosphere in which this behaviour is seen as more acceptable.

Homophobic Bullying

Homophobic bullying targets someone because of their sexual orientation (or perceived sexual orientation). It can be particularly difficult for a young person to report and is often directed at them at a very sensitive phase of their lives when identity is being developed. What might be called banter can be deemed harassment if it is at the expense of someone’s dignity and meant offensively.

The term ‘gay’ as an insult is unacceptable and should always be challenged, as such use can create an atmosphere in which a young person feels denigrated and even hounded. The term ‘gay’ is sometimes used as a proxy for racist or disablist bullying because young people may believe they can get away with using these words in an abusive way, whereas racist insults would be challenged by staff.

Bullying on the Grounds of Disability

Bullying involving young people with disabilities employs many of the same forms as other types of bullying, with name calling and pushing and shoving being common.

Additional forms include:

  • Manipulative bullying, where the perpetrator tries to get the victim to act in a certain way – do something they should not do – steal from a newsagent for example, when they may not be able to recognise that they should not do this.
  • Bullying that exploits a particular aspect of a condition such as sensitivity to sensory stimuli, lights and sounds.

Procedures

  • Any reported incidents or suspicions of bullying should be reported to the relevant Activity Coordinator.
  • The Activity Coordinator will investigate the complaint objectively and will listen carefully to all those involved, explaining the inappropriateness and consequences of reported behaviours. Where possible, the parties will be brought together to see if the issue can be resolved with a (genuine) apology.
  • If the issue cannot be resolved as outlined above the matter will be passed to the Charity Manager who will then investigate further.
  • If appropriate, parents of those involved will be informed and asked to meet with the Charity Manager to discuss the situation.
  • If the issue is not resolved, the Charity Manager will bring together a small panel (Board member, Chairman, Activity Coordinator) to meet with the parties both together and separately to try and resolve the issue.
  • If a satisfactory solution cannot be reached, the small panel will decide on the course of action to be taken.
  • If necessary and appropriate, the police will be consulted.
  • All reported cases will be recorded on an incident form and filed appropriately.

In the case of adults reported to be bullying anyone within the club under 18

  • The Charity Manager should always be informed and will advise on action to be taken where appropriate, this may include action following the Safeguarding Children and Vulnerable Adults Policy.
  • It is anticipated that in most cases where the allegation is made regarding a member of staff or volunteer, safeguarding procedures will be followed.

More serious cases may be referred to the Police and/or Children’s Social Care

Behaviour Code

This behaviour code outlines the conduct expected of staff and volunteers from Play Inclusion Project along with staff from other organisations who engage with children and young people through Play Inclusion Project and its activities.

Purpose

Following this code will help to protect children from abuse and inappropriate behaviour from adults. It will also help staff and volunteers to maintain the standard of behaviour expected of them and will reduce the possibility of unfounded allegations of abuse being made against them.

Upholding this code of behaviour

All members of staff and volunteers are expected to report any breaches of this behaviour code to the Charity Manager under the whistle-blowing procedure or, if necessary, under child protection procedures. Staff and volunteers who breach this code of behaviour may be subject to Play Inclusion Project’s disciplinary procedures.

Any breach of the code involving a volunteer or member of staff from another agency may result in them being asked to leave Play Inclusion Project. Serious breaches may also result in a referral being made to a statutory agency such as the police, the local authority children’s social care department and/or the Independent Safeguarding Authority.

When working with children and young people all staff and volunteers are acting in a position of trust. It is important that staff and volunteers are aware that they are seen as role models by children and young people and must act in an appropriate manner at all times.

When working with children and young people, it is important to:

  • operate within Play Inclusion Project’s principles, policies and procedures including Safeguarding Children and Vulnerable Adults Policy and Social Networking Policy
  • always listen to and be respectful towards children
  • avoid favouritism
  • treat children and young people fairly and without prejudice or discrimination
  • value and take children’s contributions seriously, actively involving children and young people in planning activities wherever possible
  • ensure any contact with children and young people is appropriate and in relation to the work of the project
  • always ensure language is appropriate and not offensive or discriminatory
  • always ensure equipment is used safely and for its intended purpose
  • provide examples of good conduct you wish children and young people to follow
  • challenge unacceptable behaviour and report all allegations/suspicions of abuse
  • ensure that our 2:1 ration is upheld and that there is always is more than one adult present with children and young or if this isn’t possible, ensure that you are within sight or hearing of other adults
  • respect a young person’s right to personal privacy
  • encourage young people and adults to feel comfortable and caring enough to point out attitudes or behaviour they do not like; recognise that special caution is required when you are discussing sensitive issues with children or young people.

You must not:

  • patronise or treat children and young people as if they are silly
  • allow allegations to go unreported
  • develop inappropriate relationships such as contact with children and young people that is not a part of the work of Play Inclusion Project or agreed with the manager or leader
  • conduct a sexual relationship with a child or young person or indulge in any form of sexual contact with a child or young person. Any such behaviour between an adult member of staff or volunteer and a child or young person using the services of Play Inclusion Project represents a serious breach of trust on the part of the staff member or volunteer and is not acceptable under any circumstances
  • let children and young people have your personal contact details (mobile number or address)
  • make sarcastic, insensitive, derogatory or sexually suggestive comments or gestures to or in front of children and young people
  • act in a way that can be perceived as threatening or intrusive
  • make inappropriate promises to children and young people, particularly in relation to confidentiality
  • jump to conclusions about others without checking facts
  • either exaggerate or trivialise safeguarding issues
  • rely on your reputation or that of the organisation to protect you
  • use a mobile phone or take pictures of children or young people unless instructed to do so by your Activity Coordinator

The Role of Parents and Carers

Play Inclusion Project welcomes and encourages parental involvement. Parents and carers are regarded as valuable partners in promoting positive behaviour and will be involved as appropriate. In the event of their child becoming the subject of behaviour sanctions, parents/carers will be informed and involved.

Behaviour Management Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project’s Behaviour Management Policy is to respect each child as an individual, acknowledging and promoting their rights so that each child begins to develop an understanding of the needs and rights of others as well as themselves. It is important that we help to build the child’s self esteem in order that they have the confidence to communicate their feelings in a positive way.

Parents and staff working together within a clear framework of simple rules which are consistently enforced in a manner appropriate to the age and level of understanding of their child will ensure that we promote a positive environment with clear boundaries.

Our aim is that:

  • Children will be provided with positive role models.
  • Children will be praised for acceptable behaviour and encouraged to mirror their positive role models.
  • Children will be given clear explanations as to why their behaviour has been unacceptable in a way that they can clearly comprehend.
  • Children will be encouraged to deal with disputes with other children by helping them to voice their dislike for unacceptable behaviour towards them.
  • Children will be involved in discussions (whenever possible) about acceptable and unacceptable behaviour and encouraged to express their feelings and think about the feelings of others.

Play Inclusion Project understands that children and young people with disabilities are likely to display behaviours that challenge.  We recognise that behaviours that challenge, are those that are done to serve a purpose, such as communicating an unmet need or interacting with another person.  Behaviour is considered challenging if it poses a risk or harm to the child or others.

Play Inclusion Project never uses negative statements such as ‘naughty’ and always put the emphasis on the action rather than the child personally.

Behaviour Management

We would like everyone who attends the activities we deliver to be happy, enjoy the activities and have a good time.  For everyone to do this, we need to have a behaviour policy in place for all of us (children, staff and volunteers) to act in an appropriate manner.  All children and young people should be able to enjoy and participate in activities without fear of negative or aggressive behaviour from anybody.

The following are examples of behaviour we would consider unacceptable behaviour:

  • Fighting, violent or aggressive behaviour including hitting, kicking, punching, biting or spitting
  • Abusive language including swearing at staff, other young people or members of the public
  • Dangerous behaviour including running off, climbing and being in restricted areas
  • Racist, homophobic and sexist language
  • Disrespectful behaviour towards other people
  • Deliberate damage to property
  • Bullying
  • Using your power, strength or authority to intimidate others
  • Possession of and taking of drugs, alcohol or other illegal substances
  • Use of weapons as a form of intimidation towards others
  • Continually not following instructions

When children behave in unacceptable ways:

  • They will not be singled out or humiliated in any way.  Where children display unacceptable behaviours or behaviours that challenge, they will, wherever possible be removed from the situation and offered an alternative activity.
  • Discussions with children will take place as to why their behaviour was not acceptable, respecting their level of understanding and maturity.
  • Staff will not raise their voices (other than to keep children safe).
  • It will be made clear to the child that it is the behaviour and not the child that is unwelcome.
  • We decide how to handle behaviour depending on the child’s age, level of understanding, disability and the circumstances surrounding the behaviour. This may involve asking the child to talk and think about what he/she has done.
  • All staff support children in developing empathy and children will only be asked to apologise if they have developed strong empathy skills and have a good understanding of why saying sorry is appropriate.
  • We help staff to reflect on their own responses towards episodes of behaviours that challenge to ensure that their reactions are appropriate.
  • We only use physical intervention for the purpose of averting immediate danger or personal injury to any person (including the child) or to manage a child’s behaviour as a last resort. We keep a record of any occasions where physical intervention is used and inform parents on the same day, or as reasonably practicable.
  • We recognise that there may be times where children may have regular occasions where they lose control and may need individual techniques to restrain them. This will only be carried out by staff who have been appropriately trained to do so. Any restraints will only be done following recommended guidance and training.  We will complete an incident form following any restraints used and notify the parents
  • We inform parents if their child’s behaviour is unkind to others or if their child has been upset. In all cases we deal with inappropriate behaviour at the time. We may ask parents to meet with staff to discuss their child’s behaviour, so that if there are any difficulties, we can work together to ensure consistency.
  • In some cases, we may request additional advice and support from other professionals, such as teachers.
  • We support children in developing non-aggressive strategies to enable them to express their feelings.
  • We keep confidential records on any inappropriate behaviour that has taken place. We inform parents and ask them to read and sign any incidents concerning their child

Supporting Positive Behaviour

All children are unique and should be supported in a way that reflects this.  Play Inclusion project will use the following strategies to promote positive behaviours:

  • Being consistent in approach to behaviour that challenges
  • Praising and rewarding positive behaviour
  • Role modelling positive behaviour
  • Never punishing behaviour that challenges
  • Enabling the child to communicate in a way that they prefer

COVID-19

Whilst we are operating during the COVID-19 pandemic additional rules will need to be followed to control the spread of the disease and keep everyone safe.  These are:

  • Everyone must sanitise their hands upon entering a setting
  • All individuals must regularly wash their hands
  • Social distancing measures must be followed wherever possible
  • Unfortunately due to the pandemic, any child spitting and/or biting will be sent home.

Care of Sick Children/Illness Policy

Policy Statement

Under no circumstances should a sick child or a child displaying symptoms of illness be brought to an activity session. It is our belief that sick children need to be at home where they are best cared for and can recover from the sickness.  In addition, sick children will expose children and staff members who they come into contact with. These people can then in turn expose the other children and staff at the session. Because some of the children who access are activities have weakened immune systems, your cooperation on this issue is extremely important.

Care of Sick Children

  • To control the spread of infection we need to exclude sick children with infectious illnesses from all of our activities.
  • If a child becomes ill whilst at a session, staff will make every effort to make the child comfortable.  The Activity Coordinator will contact parents/carers to arrange for the child to be collected. Parents/carers are expected to pick their child up within 1 hour.
  • If a parent/carer cannot be reached, or have not arrived within an hour, the emergency contact person will be called and asked to come and collect the child.
  • If a child is prescribed antibiotics, they must have been taking their antibiotic medicine for 48 hours before returning, to rule out any possible reactions to the medicine.
  • Children with diarrhoea and/or vomiting must be kept away from sessions until at least 48 hours after their symptoms have gone. Most cases of diarrhoea and vomiting in children get better without treatment, but if symptoms persist, consult your GP.
  • It is imperative that parents/carers notify staff if they have administered medication or if they suspect their child may be unwell.
  • If it is the case that the parent has administered medication for a high temperature that morning, the child should not attend that day.

COVID-19

  • When a child or young person develops symptoms compatible with COVID-19 such as new persistent cough, fever, a loss or change to sense of taste and/or smell whilst at a setting they will be isolated from the rest of the group and parents will be contacted immediately to arrange collection.
  • Whilst a child is awaiting collection, they will be kept separately from others by a distance of at least 2 metres, where possible in a well-ventilated room with appropriate adult supervision.
  • Staff to wear PPE when in contact with a child who becomes unwell with symptoms of COVID-19 whilst at the setting and requires personal care before they return home.   A face mask and visor should be worn by staff if a distance of 2m cannot be maintained.  If contact with the child is necessary, a face mask, visor, disposable apron and disposable gloves should be worn by staff.
  • If they need to go to the bathroom whilst waiting to be collected, they should use a separate bathroom if possible.  Following use the the bathroom should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected using standard cleaning products before anyone else uses it.
  • The child will be required to self-isolate for 7 days and parents/carers must arrange for them to have a test to see if they have coronavirus COVID-19.  Tests can be requested by visiting NHS.UK or contact NHS via telephone on 119.  Fellow household members will be required to self-isolate for 14 days.
  • If the child tests negative, they can return to sessions and fellow household members can end their self-isolation.
  • If the child tests negative but is unwell they must remain at home until they have recovered.
  • Where a child tests positive NHS Test and Trace will speak directly to those they have been in contact with to offer advice.  The advice may be that everyone at the session with the child should be sent home and self-isolate for 14 days.

The above also applies to all staff members.

Complaints Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project believes that children, parents, staff and volunteers are entitled to expect courtesy and prompt, careful attention to their needs and wishes. We welcome suggestions on how to improve our services and will give prompt and serious attention to any concerns about the running of our activities and projects. We anticipate that most concerns will be resolved quickly by an informal approach to the appropriate member of staff. If this does not achieve the desired result, we have a set of procedures for dealing with complaints.

All complaints will be kept confidential to the parties concerned unless a concern is raised in relation to a safeguarding matter or in relation to serious criminality in which case, we reserve the right to escalate the matter to the relevant authorities. However, the complaint will normally be made known to the Charity Manager who will discuss the matter with the Board of Trustees where necessary.

Complaints Procedure

Wherever possible we will try to respond and resolve the situation at an informal level. The matter will go no further unless the complainant is still dissatisfied, at which point the formal process will then begin.

Formal Complaints Procedure

  • Formal complaints should be made in writing to the Charity Manager and contain the details around the complaint, the complainants name and contact details.
  • We acknowledge that in certain instances a complainant may wish to remain anonymous. In such incidences we will review the nature of the complaint and decide on follow up action if deemed necessary.

When investigating complaints, the Charity Manager will ensure that:

  • The complainant is fully understood m- this may require meeting with or talking to the complainant
  • There is an understanding of the response of staff or the situation in which the problem arose. This may involve speaking to and/or interviewing staff and volunteers or reviewing any written records
  • When interviewing complainants, staff or volunteers, they should be offered the opportunity to bring someone with them.

As a result of the investigation, actions may include:

  • Specific Improvements to service
  • Bringing together parties to mediate the dispute
  • Recommendations on staff training
  • Should the Charity Manager consider that an accusation be deemed so serious so as to question the safety of any child/children in our care, immediate action will be taken to remove the person involved, against whom the accusation has been made or rectify/make safe the area of concern.

Timescales

  • All complaints will be acknowledged within 7 working days.
  • In most cases we aim to provide a full response within 14 working days. However, if this is not possible because, for example, a detailed investigation is required, we will provide an interim reply explaining what is being done to deal with the complaint and providing a revised timetable.
  • A full response will be then sent in writing within 14 working days. In some cases, the complainant may have expressed a preference for a telephone discussion regarding the outcome. However, this will always be followed up by a written response so that both parties have a written record of the outcome.
  • Actions identified as a result of a complaint should be implemented within a reasonable timetable.
  • All records will be kept on file for 5 years.

Appeals Procedure

The following appeals procedure will apply in cases where the complainant is not satisfied with the initial response:

In cases where the complainant is dissatisfied with the outcome of their complaint, they are entitled to appeal the decision within seven day of receiving the response to the trustees.

Appeals will be responded to by the trustees within 14 working days in writing.

COVID-19 policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project is committed to protecting the health and well-being of all staff, volunteers and service users.  We are following government advice which is outlined in this policy to manage the spread of COVID-19 caused by the coronavirus.  Employees also have a duty to take reasonable care of their own health and safety and that of those they work with.

Symptoms of coronavirus

COVID-19 is a new illness that can affect the lungs and airways, it is caused by a virus called coronavirus. Symptoms include:

  • a new continuous cough
  • a high temperature
  • a loss of, or change in, your normal sense of taste or smell (anosmia)

Employees, volunteers, children and young people must not attend work or an activity session if they have symptoms of COVID-19, a member of their household has symptoms or if they have tested positive in the last 10 days.

Anyone developing symptoms whilst at work or an activity session will be sent home.

Procedure

  • If you develop symptoms you will be required to self-isolate for at least 10 days and must arrange to have a test to see if you have coronavirus COVID-19.  Tests can be requested by visiting www.NHS.UK or contact the NHS via telephone on 119.  Fellow household members will be required to self-isolate for 14 days.
  • Anyone testing positive whilst not experiencing symptoms but goes on to develops symptoms during the isolation period must restart the 10day isolation period from the day the symptoms start.
  • Consider alerting people outside of your household who you have had close contact with over the last 48 hours to let them know you have symptoms of coronavirus COVID-19.
  • After 10 days, if you still have a temperature you should continue to self-isolate and seek medical advice. You do not need to self-isolate after 10 days if you only have a cough or loss of sense of smell or taste, as these symptoms can last for several weeks after the infection has gone.
  • If you live with others, all other household members need to stay at home and not leave the house for 14 days. The 14-day period starts from the day when the first person in the household became ill or if they do not have symptoms, from the day their test was taken. If anyone else in the household starts displaying symptoms, they need to stay at home for at least 10 days from when their symptoms appear, regardless of what day they are on in their original 14-day isolation period.
  • If you feel you cannot cope with your symptoms at home, or your condition gets worse, then use the NHS 111 online COVID-19 service. If you do not have internet access, call NHS 111. For a medical emergency dial 999.
  • If someone tests negative, feels well and no longer has symptoms similar to COVID-19 they can stop self-isolating.  Other members of the household can also stop isolating.
  • If the test is negative but you are unwell you must remain at home until you have recovered.
  • Following a positive test result, you will receive a request by text, email or phone to log into the NHS Test and Trace service website and provide information about recent close contacts.

Procedure for if a child/young person becomes unwell during a session:

  • When a child or young person develops symptoms compatible with COVID-19 such as new persistent cough, fever, a loss or change to sense of taste and/or smell whilst at a setting they will be isolated from the rest of the group and parents will be contacted immediately to arrange collection.
  • Whilst a child is awaiting collection, they will be kept separately from others by a distance of at least 2 metres, where possible in a well-ventilated room with appropriate adult supervision.
  • PPE should be worn by staff waiting with the child whilst they await collection A face mask and visor should be worn by staff along with disposable apron and disposable gloves.
  • If they need to go to the bathroom whilst waiting to be collected, they should use a separate bathroom if possible.  Following use, the bathroom should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected using standard cleaning products before anyone else uses it.
  • The child will be required to self-isolate for at least 10days and parents/carers must arrange for them to have a test to see if they have coronavirus COVID-19.  Tests can be requested by visiting NHS.UK or contact NHS via telephone on 119.  Fellow household members will be required to self-isolate for 14 days.
  • If the child tests negative, is feeling well and no longer has symptoms of COVID-19 they can return to sessions and fellow household members can end their self-isolation.
  • If the child tests negative but is unwell they must remain at home until they have recovered.
  • Where a child tests positive NHS Test and Trace will speak directly to those they have been in contact with to offer advice.  The advice may be that everyone at the session with the child should be sent home and self-isolate for 14 days.
  1. The above also applies to all staff members.

NHS England are advising the following to avoid catching or spreading COVID-19:

  • Wash your hands with soap and water often for at least 20 seconds
  • Always wash your hands when you get home or into work
  • Use hand sanitizer gel if soap and water are unavailable
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue or your sleeve (not your hands) when you cough or sneeze
  • Put used tissues in the bin immediately and wash your hands afterwards
  • Try to avoid close contact with people who are unwell
  • Follow social distancing measures (1meter plus)
  • Wear a face covering in shops, on public transport and other venues where it is required.

How to Self-isolate

If you are required to self-isolate, you need to stay indoors and avoid contact with other people for at least 10 days.

DO:

  • try to keep at least 2 metres (3 steps) from other people in your home, particularly older people, those with long-term health conditions or those who are shielding
  • ask friends and family and delivery services to deliver things like food shopping and medicines – but avoid contact with them
  • sleep alone if possible
  • regularly wash your hands with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds
  • drink plenty of water and take everyday painkillers, such as paracetamol and ibuprofen, to help with your symptoms
  • If you are unable to work, refer to the Department of Work and Pensions to find out about the support that is available to you.

For more information refer to the following government guidance:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-stay-at-home-guidance/stay-at-home-guidance-for-households-with-possible-coronavirus-covid-19-infection

NHS Test and Trace 

If you are contacted by the NHS Test and Trace service because you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-1

  1. you will be alerted by the NHS Test and Trace service if you have been in close contact with someone who has tested positive for COVID-19. The alert will usually ce by text, email or phone call. You should then log on to the NHS Test and Trace website, which is normally the easiest way for you and the service to communicate with each other – but, if not, a trained call handler will talk you through what you must do. Under-18s will get a phone call and a parent or guardian will be asked to give permission for the call to continue.
  2. you will be told to begin self-isolation for 14 days from your last contact with the person who has tested positive. It’s really important to do this even if you don’t feel unwell because, if you have been infected, you could become infectious to others at any point up to 14 days. Your household doesn’t need to self-isolate with you, if you do not have symptoms, but they must take extra care to follow the guidance on social distancing and handwashing and avoid contact with you at home.
  3. if you develop symptoms, other members of your household must self-isolate immediately at home for 14 days and you must get a test to check if you have COVID-19  or call 119 if you have no internet access. If your test is positive, you must continue to stay at home for at least 10 days and we will get in touch to ask about your contacts since they must self-isolate. If your test is negative, you must still complete your 14-day self-isolation period because the virus may not be detectable yet – this is crucial to avoid unknowingly spreading the virus

Data Protection Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project needs to collect and use personal information about staff, volunteers, children, young people, parents and carers and any other individuals that come into contact with the company.  This personal information must be collected and dealt with appropriately, whether it is collected on paper, stored in a computer database, or recorded on other material and there are safeguards to ensure this under the General Data Protection Regulations (GDPR).

Purpose

This policy is intended to ensure that personal information is dealt with correctly and securely and in accordance with GDPR, and other related legislation.  It ensures that Play Inclusion Project:

  • Complies with data protection law and follows good practice
  • Protects the rights of staff, volunteers, service users and partners
  • Is open about how it stores and processes individual’s data
  • Protects itself from the risks of a data breach

All staff involved with the collection, processing and disclosure of personal data will be aware of their duties and responsibilities by adhering to these guidelines.

What is Personal Information?

The GDPR applies to ‘personal data’ meaning any information relating to an identifiable person who can be directly or indirectly identified in particular by reference to an identifier.

This definition provides for a wide range of personal identifiers to constitute personal data, including name, identification number, location data or online identifier, reflecting changes in technology and the way organisations collect information about people.

The GDPR applies to both automated personal data and to manual filing systems where personal data are accessible according to specific criteria. This could include chronologically ordered sets of manual records containing personal data.

What is sensitive Personal Data?

Sensitive personal data (‘special categories of personal data’ under the General Data Protection Regulation) includes any information that reveals your racial or ethnic origin, religious, political or philosophical beliefs, genetic data, biometric data for the purposes of unique identification, trade union membership, or information about your health/sex life. Generally, we try not to collect or process any sensitive personal information about you, unless authorised by law or where necessary to comply with applicable laws

Data Protection Law

The general data protection regulation (GDPR) is a new EU law that will come into effect on 25 May 2018 to replace the current Data Protection Act. It’s the biggest overhaul of data protection legislation for over 25years and will introduce new requirements for how organisations process personal data.

All personal data must be processed lawfully, fairly and in a transparent manner.  It must be collected for specified, explicit and legitimate purposes and not further processed in a manner that is incompatible with those purposes.  It must be adequate, relevant and limited to what is necessary in relation to the purpose for which it is processed.  It must be accurate and, where necessary, kept up to date and kept in a form which permits identification of data subjects for no longer than is necessary for the purpose for which the data is processed, including protection against unauthorised or unlawful processing.

Data Protection Principles

To comply with the law personal data must be processed according to 6 data protection principles: must be collected and used fairly, stored safely and not disclosed unlawfully.

  1. Personal data shall be processed fairly, lawfully and transparently
  2. Personal data shall be collected only for specific legitimate purposes
  3. Personal data shall be adequate, relevant and limited to what is necessary
  4. Personal data shall be kept accurate and up to date
  5. Personal data processed for any purpose shall not be kept for longer than is necessary
  6. Personal data shall be kept secure i.e. protected by appropriate security, integrity and confidentiality.

Play Inclusion Project regards the lawful and correct treatment of personal information as very important to successful working, and to maintaining the confidence of those with whom we deal.

Play Inclusion Project will, through appropriate management and strict application of criteria and controls:

  • Observe fully conditions regarding the fair collection and use of information
  • Meet its legal obligations to specify the purposes for which information is used
  • Collect and process appropriate information, and only to the extent that it is needed to fulfill its operational needs or to comply with any legal requirements
  • Ensure the quality of information used
  • Ensure that the rights of people about whom information is held, can be fully exercised under GDPR. These include:
    • The right to access information we hold about you
  • The right to correct and update the information we hold
  • The right to have your information erased
  • The right to object to the processing of your data
  • The right to ask us to stop contacting you with direct marketing
  • The right to data portability
  • The right to object to automated decision making
  • The right to complain
  • Take appropriate technical and organisational security measures to safeguard personal information
  • Ensure that personal information is not transferred abroad without suitable safeguards
  • Treat people justly and fairly whatever their age, religion, disability, gender, sexual orientation or ethnicity when dealing with requests for information
  • Set out clear procedures for responding to requests for information

Data collection

Under GDPR there are strict rules in place for obtaining consent.

  • Consent must be freely given, specific, informed and unambiguous
  • A request for consent must be intelligible and in clear plain language
  • Silence, pre-ticked boxes and inactivity no longer suffice as consent
  • Consent can be withdrawn at any time
  • Consent for online services from a child under 13 is only valid with parental consent
  • Organisations must be able to evidence consent

Play Inclusion Project will ensure that data is collected within the boundaries defined in this policy. This applies to data that is collected in person, or by completing a form.

When collecting data, Play Inclusion Project will ensure that the individual/service user:

  1. Clearly understands why the information is needed
  2. Understands what it will be used for and what the consequences are should the individual/service user decide not to give consent to processing
  3. As far as reasonably possible, grants explicit written consent,
  4. Is, as far as reasonably practicable, competent enough to give consent and has given so freely without any duress
  5. Has received sufficient information on why their data is needed and how it will be used

Disclosure

Play Inclusion Project may share data with other agencies such as the local authority, funding bodies and other voluntary agencies.

The individual/service user will be made aware in most circumstances how and with whom their information will be shared.  There are circumstances where the law allows the company to disclose data (including sensitive data) without the data subject’s consent.

These are:

  1. Carrying out a legal duty or as authorised by the Secretary of State
  2. Protecting vital interests of an individual/service user or other person
  3. The individual/service user has already made the information public
  4. Conducting any legal proceedings, obtaining legal advice or defending any legal rights
  5. Monitoring for equal opportunities purposes – i.e. race, disability or religion
  6. Providing a confidential service where the individual/service user’s consent cannot be obtained or where it is reasonable to proceed without consent: e.g. where we would wish to avoid forcing stressed or ill individuals/service users to provide consent signatures.

Data Storage

Information and records relating to individuals/service users will be stored securely and will only be accessible to authorised staff and volunteers.

Information will be stored for only as long as it is needed or required statute and will be disposed of appropriately.

It is the Play Inclusion Project’s responsibility to ensure all personal and company data is non-recoverable from any computer system previously used within the organisation, which has been passed on or sold to a third party.

The following guidelines apply to data that is usually stored electronically but has been printed out for some reason:

  • When not required, paper or files should be kept in a locked drawer or filing cabinet
  • Staff should ensure paper and printouts are not left where unauthorised people could see them e.g. on printers
  • Data printouts should be shredded and disposed of securely when no longer required.

When data is stored electronically it must be protected from unauthorised access, accidental deletion and malicious hacking attempts:

  • Data should be protected by strong passwords which are never shared and changed regularly
  • Data stored on removeable media must be kept locked away when not in use
  • Data should be backed up frequently and backups tested regularly
  • All servers and computers containing data should be protected by approved security and a firewall

Staff Guidelines

  • The only people able to access data covered by this policy should be those who need it for their work
  • Data should not be shared informally. When access to confidential is required, employees can request it form the Charity Manager.
  • Staff should keep all data secure, by taking sensible precautions and following the guidelines below
  • When working with personal data, staff should ensure their computer screens are always locked when left unattended.
  • In particular; strong passwords should be used and never shared
  • Personal data should not be disclosed to unauthorised people, wither within the company or externally
  • Data should be reviewed regularly and updated, if it is found to be out of date or no longer required it should be deleted and disposed of.
  • Staff should never save copies of personal data to their own personal computers.
  • Staff should request help from the Charity Manager if they are unsure about any aspect of data protection.

Data access and accuracy

The law requires Play Inclusion Project to take reasonable steps to ensure data is kept up to date and accurate.

It is the responsibility of all staff working with personal data to take reasonable steps to ensure it is kept accurate and as up to date as possible.

  • Data will be held in as few places as necessary, staff should not create any unnecessary data sets
  • Data should be updated as inaccuracies are discovered e.g. if a volunteer cannot be reached on their stored telephone number it should be removed from the database
  • Staff should check information held is up to date every 12 months

All individuals who are the subject of personal data held by the company are entitled to:

  • Ask what information is held about them and why
  • Ask how to gain access to it
  • Be informed as to how to keep it up to date
  • Be informed how the company is meeting it’s data protection obligations

In addition, Play Inclusion Project will ensure that:

  • Everyone processing personal information understands that they are contractually responsible for following good data protection practice
  • Everyone processing personal information is appropriately trained to do so
  • Everyone processing personal information is appropriately supervised
  • Anybody wanting to make enquiries about handling personal information knows what to do
  • It deals promptly and courteously with any enquiries about handling personal information
  • It describes clearly how it handles personal information
  • All staff are aware that a breach of the rules and procedures identified in this policy may lead to disciplinary action being taken against them

This policy will be updated as necessary to reflect best practice in data management, security and control and to ensure compliance with any changes or amendments made to the General Data Protection regulations.

Disclosure and Barring Service Policy

Policy Statement

As an organisation using the Disclosure & Barring Service (DBS) checking service to help assess the suitability of applicants for positions of trust, Play Inclusion Project complies fully with the Code of Practice regarding the correct handling, use, storage, retention and disposal of certificates and certificate information. It also complies fully with its obligations under the Data Protection Act 1998 and other relevant legislation pertaining to the safe handling, use, storage, retention and disposal of certificate information.

All prospective volunteers and staff must undergo an Enhanced Level Disclosure and Barring Service check following interview.  All Management Committee Members must undergo a Standard Level Disclosure and Barring Service check. All voluntary and paid positions are offered subject to satisfactory Enhanced Level DBS clearance

Volunteers or staff refusing to undergo an Enhanced Level DBS check will be unable to be involved with Play Inclusion Project.

Storage and access

Certificate information is never kept on an employee’s or volunteer’s personal file and is always kept separately and securely, by the Charity Manager, with access strictly controlled and limited to those who are entitled to see it as part of their duties. Play Inclusion Project maintains a record of all those who have applied for a DBS check and for whom certificates or certificate information has been revealed and we recognises that it is a criminal offence to pass this information to anyone who is not entitled to receive it.

Handling

In accordance with section 124 of the Police Act 1997, certificate information is only passed to those who are authorised to receive it in the course of their duties. Information on DBS Disclosures will be kept confidential and information will only be passed on to those authorised to receive it in the course of their duties. We recognise it is a criminal offence to pass it to anyone not entitled to receive it.

Usage

Certificate information is only used for the specific purpose for which it was requested and for which the applicant’s full consent has been given.

Retention

Play Inclusion Project will keep a photocopy of all employee and volunteer DBS certificates for 6 months, this is to allow for the consideration and resolution of any disputes or complaints. If in very exceptional circumstances it is considered necessary to keep the DBS Disclosure information longer than six months Play Inclusion Project will consult the DBS and give full consideration to Data Protection and the individuals Human Rights before doing so. The usual conditions of storage will apply.

If there are any documents relating to decisions following a DBS Disclosure being received with information detailed on it, they will be filed with the individuals DBS Disclosure and be stored, accessed and destroyed under the same conditions.

Disposal

Once the retention period has elapsed, Play Inclusion Project will ensure that any DBS certificate information is immediately destroyed by placing it in the Shred-It bin (further information can be found in the Shred-It Policy).  However, notwithstanding the above, Play Inclusion Project will keep a record of the date of issue of a certificate, the name of the individual and the unique reference number of the certificate.

Procedure

  • Prior to interview all applicants will be emailed a copy of the DBS’s Privacy Notice and asked to read it.
  • During their interview all applicants will be informed that the DBS has a Code of Practice which can be found online.  Applicants will be asked if they would like a copy sent to them.
  • Applicants will be asked to disclose any non-conviction information that may be related to their suitability.
  • All applicants must provide information in line with the requirements of the DBS form, all mandatory fields on the form must be completed.
  • Documents that provide proof of an applicant’s identity are required.  Applicants are required to follow Route 1 of the identity checking guidelines wherever possible.  If applicants cannot provide the documents required for Route 1, Route 2 must be followed. If documents required for Routes 1 or 2 cannot be provided Route 3 should be followed.  Route 3 can only be used when it is impossible for Routes 1 and 2 to be used.

Identity Checking

  • you must only accept valid, current and original documentation
  • you must not accept photocopies
  • you must not accept documentation printed from the internet e.g. internet bank statements
  • identity information for the applicant’s name, date of birth and address recorded in section A and section B on the DBS application form must be validated
  • you should in the first instance, seek documents with photographic identity (e.g. passport, new style driving licence, etc.) and for this to be compared against the applicant’s likeness
  • all documents must be in the applicant’s current name as recorded in section A
  • one document must confirm the applicant’s date of birth as recorded in section A
  • you must ensure that the applicant declares all previous name changes, and provides documentary proof to support the change of name. If the applicant is unable to provide proof to support the change of name, you should hold a probing discussion with the applicant about the reasons why before considering to validate their identity
  • you must see at least one document to confirm the applicant’s current address as recorded in section B, in accordance with the guidance
  • you must provide a full and continuous address history covering the last five years. Where possible you should seek documentation to confirm this address history
  • you should cross-match the applicant’s address history with any other information you have been provided with as part of the recruitment, such as their Curriculum Vitae (CV). This can highlight if an address has not been given e.g. if the applicant’s CV shows that they have worked in Liverpool in the last five years, but the application form only shows London addresses, you may wish to question the applicant further about this
  • a document from each of the groups should be included only once in the document count e.g. don’t accept two bank statements as two of the required documents, if they are from the same bank
  • you should not accept the foreign equivalent of an identity document if that document is listed as ‘(UK)’ on the list of valid identity documents.
  • If individuals have spent long periods of their life abroad or have had little residence in the United Kingdom applicants may need to be fingerprinted.
  • Applicants will be asked to disclose any non-conviction information that may be related to their suitability.
  • A copy of the Recruitment of Volunteers with a Criminal Record Policy will be given to applicants on request.

Submitting a DBS form

  • Completed DBS forms are to be submitted to the lead signatory along with  application form B.
  • The lead signatory will check the form and complete sections 68-73.
  • The lead signatory will record the date, form number, and name of applicant in the DBS file and will then post the form to the DBS office.
  • If a DBS application takes longer than eight weeks to be returned, Play Inclusion Project will enquire about its progress on the applicant’s behalf.

Citing and Clearance

  • All volunteers and staff will receive their own copy of the DBS clearance directly from the DBS office.  The lead signatory must then cite the DBS for clearance.
  • The lead signatory will record the DBS number, the date received by the applicant and will cross reference the details on the DBS form with those recorded in Application form B
  • An enhanced disclosure will contain details of all convictions held.
  • Where the information on Application form B matches that on the DBS form the application form B will be placed in the Shred-It bin for safe disposal.

Dealing with Convictions

  • Play Inclusion Project operates a formal procedure if a DBS check is returned with details of convictions. Consideration will be given to:
  • the nature, seriousness and relevance of the offence
  • how long ago the offence occurred
  • one-off or history of offences
  • changes in circumstances
  • rehabilitation and remorse
  • A formal meeting will take place face-to-face to establish the facts with the Charity Manager. A decision will be made following this meeting.
  • When assessing the relevance of convictions to employment or volunteering Play Inclusion Project will consider the following about a person’s offences –
  • Fraud/Theft – as the post does not involve direct access to money or property and as volunteers work within groups and never alone and supervision given is high, this conviction will not go against an application.
  • Driving offences – as volunteers are not permitted to transport children unless specifically requested and risk assessments are carried out, this conviction will not go against an application.
  • Offences involving violence/threatening behaviour (excluding specified schedule four offences) – each case will be considered individually. A decision will be made by the Charity Manager in consultation with the Management Committee.
  • Sexual offences – a person with these offences would never be considered for volunteering or employment with Play Inclusion Project.
  • A disclosure of criminal convictions will not necessarily exclude a person from volunteering or employment. However, if the conviction is a specified Schedule Four Offence then the person would be rejected as a volunteer or member of staff. See below
  • murder or manslaughter
  • rape or burglary with intent to commit rape
  • grievous bodily harm
  • cruelty to children
  • kidnapping, false imprisonment and abduction
  • indecent assault on a man or a woman
  • sexual intercourse with a child under 13
  • intercourse with a girl between 13 and 16
  • buggery with a child under 16
  • indecency between men
  • abuse of trust
  • incest and related offences
  • assault with intent to commit buggery
  • indecency with children under the age of 14
  • offences relating to or encouraging child prostitution
  • offences relating to child pornography
  • If the DBS Disclosure shows the applicant is registered on the Dfes List 99, the PoVA List, the PoCA List or the National Assembly of Wales List they are banned from working with children and/or vulnerable adults and it is an offence for them to apply for voluntary work with children and/or vulnerable adults and for us to take them on as a volunteer. If the situation arises the Charity Manager will contact the local police for guidance.
  • If there are any documents relating to decisions following a DBS Disclosure being received with information detailed on it, they will be filed with the individuals DBS Disclosure and be stored, accessed and destroyed under the same conditions.

Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974

As we work with children and vulnerable young people, we are exempt from the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 so prospective volunteers and staff are required to disclose, when given the opportunity, details of cautions, reprimands, final warnings and spent and unspent convictions. They are also asked to give details of current police enquiries following allegations against them and pending prosecutions. This information will be stored with the individuals DBS clearance and be stored, accessed and destroyed under the same conditions.

If a volunteer or member of staff is aware of any police enquiries and/or pending prosecutions following allegations against them or receives a caution, reprimand, final warning or conviction while they are currently volunteering/working they must inform the Charity Manager immediately. Failure to do so could result in disciplinary action.

Rechecking Staff and Volunteers

Existing volunteers and staff must complete a new DBS application two years.

Emergency Closure Policy

Policy Statement

It is Play Inclusion Project’s aim to ensure the safety of all staff, volunteers and service users in compliance with the Health & Safety at Work Act (1974).  Whilst we endeavour to maintain a full service and cause minimum disruption to our provision there may be circumstances that arise that are beyond Play Inclusion Project’s control and force the activities to be cancelled.

Decisions to cancel sessions will not be made lightly and will be made based on an assessment of a number of factors including weather and travel conditions, access to and conditions of the base premises, outbreaks of infection/illness and availability of appropriate levels of qualified staff.

COVID-19

In the event there are inadequate staff levels to deliver a session safely due to an outbreak of COVID-19 or staff being advised to self-isolate as part of the government’s track and trace system the emergency closure procedure shall be implemented.  Bringing staff into a new social bubble will be a last resort and should, where possible, be avoided.

The decision to cancel sessions will be made by the Charity Manager after discussion with the Activity Coordinator.  Every effort will be made to contact parents/carers as soon as possible.

Emergency Closure Procedure

The following procedure will be followed wherever possible:

  • If a decision to cancel is made prior to the session’s start time all parents/carers and staff will be contacted at the time of the decision.
  • If a decision to close is made during the session parents/carers will be contacted and asked to collect their child/children
  • Two members of staff will stay with the children/young people if it is safe to do so until they have all been collected and signed out
  • Reasons for closure will be explained to parents/carers and an estimate of when the group is likely to re-open given where possible
  • An up to date record of emergency contact details for each child and staff member will be kept in the group file, in the office and with Activity Coordinators.
  • Should severe weather conditions occur during a session the group supervisor will contact parents/carers and ask them to collect their child
  • Should you wake up to severe weather conditions please contact your group supervisor who will advise as to whether the group is going ahead

It is vital that Play Inclusion Project has up to date contact numbers for parents/carers and emergency contact numbers for children, young people and staff.

Contingency Planning For Emergency Staff Cover

In the event of unforeseen staff shortages, the Activity Coordinator will attempt to cover absences by contacting other support staff who are not rostered to work that day.  If support staff are unavailable volunteers may be called on to cover absences.  If the Activity Coordinator is unable to secure adequate cover the above procedure will be implemented.

COVID-19

In the event there are inadequate staff levels to deliver a session safely due to an outbreak of COVID-19 or staff being advised to self-isolate as part of the government’s track and trace system the emergency closure procedure shall be implemented.

Environmental Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project is committed to preventing pollution and to complying with all relevant environmental legislation, regulations and other environmental requirements.

We will regularly review and evaluate the environmental impact of our activities, products and services and we will take any necessary action to continually improve our environmental performance.

It is our policy to:

  • Minimise the use of energy, water and natural resources
  • Minimise waste through prevention, re-use and recycling wherever possible
  • Dispose of waste safely and legally
  • Avoid the use of hazardous materials, wherever practical
  • Work with environmentally responsible suppliers
  • Prevent environmental damage and minimise nuisance factors such as noise and air pollution

 

We will continually seek opportunities to improve our environmental performance by establishing objectives and targets, measuring progress, and reporting our results; including but not limited to energy, water, paper and fuel consumption and vehicle miles travelled.

Epilepsy Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project recognises that Epilepsy is a common condition effecting children and young people and welcomes children and young people with Epilepsy to attend the Activity Clubs and weekly groups. This policy supplements the ‘Administration of Medication and Care of Sick Children’ and ‘Health and Safety’ policies.

Play Inclusion Project has a responsibility to safeguard all children and young people who attend our activities.  If a child has epilepsy, this should be detailed in their individual care plan and medication form.  Activity Coordinators should also have a copy of the child’s individual epilepsy plan completed by their personal epilepsy nurse/parent/carer.  This policy ensures appropriate staff, receive relevant training about Epilepsy.

Record Keeping

Details of a child’s epilepsy will be recorded in their individual care plan.  Details recorded will include the types of seizures the child experiences, how the seizure presents, warning signs, triggers and the normal length of time for a seizure.

Details of medications taken will be recorded on the child’s medication form.

Types of Seizures

Tonic – Colonic seizure

Children who have tonic-clonic seizures (previously known as grand-mal) lose consciousness and fall to the ground. Their body goes stiff and their limbs jerk, irregular breathing can cause blueness of the lips and the individual may lose control of their bladder/bowels. When their seizure is over, their consciousness returns, but they may be very confused and tired. It’s important that you stay with them at this point whilst they recover.

First Aid for tonic-clonic seizures

First aid for the pupil’s seizure type will be included on their individual health plan and Activity Coordinators will receive basic training on administering first aid.

The following first aid procedure is for tonic-clonic seizures

  • Stay calm.
  • If the child is convulsing, put something soft under their head.
  • Protect the child from injury (remove harmful objects from nearby).
  • NEVER try and put anything in their mouth or between their teeth.
  • Try and time how long the seizure lasts – if it lasts longer than usual for that child or continues for more than five minutes then call medical assistance.
  • When the child finishes their seizure stay with them and reassure them.
  • Do not try and move the child unless they are in danger.
  • Do not try and restrain the child.
  • Do not give them food or drink until they have fully recovered from the seizure.
  • Aid breathing by gently placing the child in the recovery position once the seizure has finished.

Sometimes a child may become incontinent during their seizure. If this happens, try and put a blanket around them when their seizure is finished to avoid potential embarrassment

Absence seizure

During an absence seizure the child will briefly lose consciousness but will not lose muscle tone or collapse.  They will appear to be daydreaming or distracted for a few seconds.  While these episodes may seem unimportant, they can happen hundreds of times a day. This can cause the child to become confused about what is happening around them.  Generally, no first aid is needed for these seizures.

Complex partial seizures

This type of seizure can be difficult to recognise. The child’s consciousness level will be affected to some extent, and they will not be fully in touch with what is happening around them. During the seizure they may do things repeatedly, such as swallowing, scratching or looking for something. Complex partial seizures can be misinterpreted as bad behaviour. In fact, the child will not know what has happened and will not remember what they were doing before the seizure started.

Although there is no real first aid needed for complex partial seizures, it’s important not to restrain the young person unless they are in immediate danger. This is because they may not recognise you and become frightened. However, if the child is walking towards a busy road, you should try to guide them to safety. When the seizure ends the child is likely to be confused, so it is vital to stay with them and reassure them.

Myoclonic seizures

When a child has a myoclonic seizure the muscles of any part of their body jerks. These jerks are common in one or both arms and can be a single movement or the jerking may continue for a period of time. Myoclonic seizures happen most often in the morning, and teachers need to bear in mind that a child may be tired or lack concentration if they start school after having one of these. There is no first aid needed for myoclonic seizures unless the child has been injured, when usual first aid procedures are used. If the child is distressed by the seizure, they may need comforting and generally reassuring.

Atonic seizures

Atonic seizures cause a child to lose muscle tone. When this happens the child falls to the ground without warning. This can result in injuries to the face and head. Children who have regular atonic seizures may need to wear protective headgear to avoid injuries. There is no first aid needed for atonic seizures, unless the child is injured during the fall.

General seizure advice

Tonic-clonic seizures are the most widely recognised type of epileptic seizure. It’s important to note that most children need a rest following this kind of seizure. Depending on how they are feeling, they may be able to return to the session. However, if they take many hours to recover, they may need to be sent home.

Medication

The majority of children with epilepsy take anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) to control their seizures. These drugs are usually taken twice a day, at home. This means there should be no issues about storing or administrating medicines during activities. The only time medicine may be urgently needed by a child with epilepsy is when their seizures fail to stop after the usual time or the child goes into status epilepticus. Status epilepticus is defined as a prolonged seizure or a series of seizures without regaining consciousness in between. This is a medical emergency and is potentially life threatening. If this happens, emergency medication needs to be administered by a trained member of staff. If this isn’t possible an ambulance should be called.

Rescue Medication

In the event a child requires rescue medication to stop a seizure, the Activity Coordiantor will follow the details contained in the child’s care plan and time the length of the seizure.

Play Inclusion Project staff have been trained to administer Buccal Midazolam.  The medication will be administered into the buccal cavity and rubbed in through the cheek, with half being administered on one side of the mouth and half on the other.

If a child or young person is having a seizure, rescue medication will be administered at 5 minutes and an ambulance will be called.

As with all medication the child’s name must be on the box/packaging and the paper seal must not be broken.  The above procedure for administering medication will be followed. 

NO MEDICATION WILL BE ADMINISTERED WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN

CONSENT OF PARENTS/CARERS

When to call Emergency Services

Emergency services must be called if:

·         It is the child’s first seizure

·         The seizure lasts a total of 5 minutes without coming out of it.

·         The seizure is 3 minutes longer than the normal pattern on the child plan.

·         The child is injured.

·         The child’s breathing is severely impaired

·         The child does not regain consciousness

·         Further seizures occur without a child regaining consciousness

Equal Opportunity and Diversity Policy

Policy Statement

Equal opportunity and diversity are about dignity; the worth of each individual, the elimination of prejudice and of judgements based on fear and prejudice. Play Inclusion Project is striving for excellence in its service. We are aiming to provide equal opportunity in all our services and to all our service users.

Play Inclusion Project wholeheartedly endorses the principle of equal opportunities and diversity for all members of society and believes that all persons connected to the organisation should be treated fairly and equitably. Our Equal Opportunity and Diversity Policy aims to ensure no employee, job applicant, current or prospective volunteer, trainee or service user is placed at a disadvantage by reason of their race, colour, ethnic origins, culture, gender or gender reassignment, marital status, disability, offending background, pregnancy or maternity, class, sexual orientation, age, trade union activities, political or religious beliefs, or by requirements or conditions which cannot be justifiable on other grounds.

All employees, job applicants, current or prospective volunteers, trainees and service users will be treated with dignity and respect and we will provide an environment free from unlawful discrimination, harassment or victimisation.

Play Inclusion Project considers it to be the duty of all individuals involved in the organisation to accept personal responsibility for the practical application of this policy.

General Policy

  • Play Inclusion Project is committed to the provision of equality of opportunity for all and is formulating and implementing policies and practices to this end.
  • In the provision of equal opportunities, the charity realises and accepts its responsibilities under the law. The policy also aims to reach beyond legislative boundaries to provide equality of opportunity regardless of age, colour, ethnic origin, family responsibility, gender, marital status, nationality, race, religion, or disability.

Employment rights

  • Play Inclusion Project is an equal opportunities employer. It is important that people from all groups in society are represented at all levels of employment. This is important both for the success and development of the charity and for the provision of role models.
  • The recruitment policies at Play Inclusion Project will strive to eliminate unfair discrimination at each stage of the recruitment process and throughout an individual’s period of employment;
  • Play Inclusion Project aims to act positively, by means of good practice, to redress society’s discrimination;
  • Play Inclusion Project will ensure that all employees and all those acting on behalf of the charity are aware of and abide by the Equal Opportunity and Diversity Policy.
  • Play Inclusion Project continues to establish systematic programmes of change across the Project, to empower volunteers and staff who are disabled to achieve their full potential.

Responsibility

  • Overall responsibility for equal opportunities and diversity lies with the members of the Management Committee who are responsible for ensuring that the Equal Opportunity and Diversity Policy is implemented in their areas of responsibility.
  • The Manager and Chair are responsible for taking any action on decisions relating to equal opportunities in employment matters, coordinating the monitoring of the effectiveness of the policy and providing general guidance in relation to this policy.
  • All employees and volunteers are responsible for ensuring that their actions are carried out in the terms of their general policy and codes of practice. They maybe held personally accountable should any complaint arise.
  • The development and monitoring of the Equal Opportunity and Diversity Policy is supported by the Manager who is responsible for developing and coordinating initiatives that will enhance diversity and equality of opportunity within the charity.

Application

  • The general policy relates to all aspects of employment and volunteering, including advertisements, recruitment, pay, terms and conditions of service, training, volunteer and staff opportunities, benefits, promotions, grievance and disciplinary procedures.
  • Persons not employed by Play Inclusion Project but who are involved in activities, such as visitors, clients, external contractors etc, are expected to operate within the terms of the general policy.
  • The policy applies to the treatment of potential as well as existing employees and volunteers.
  • Play Inclusion Project is committed to a working and learning environment that is free from unlawful discrimination.
  • Play Inclusion Project is committed to a working and learning environment that is free of intimidation or unlawful harassment as defined in the Sex Discrimination Act (1975) and the Race Relations Act (1976).
  • Play Inclusion Project is committed to using language spoken, written and visual, which avoids sexism and racism, or languages offensive to those with a disability within the organisation. This includes all its official documents, committee reports and promotional and advertising material thus embracing best practice.

Implementation

  • Consultation with staff and volunteers will be a necessary part of implementing the general policy and the specific policies and procedures.
  • Staff and volunteers will be informed of their responsibilities towards the promotion and implementation of equal opportunity and diversity policies and procedures.
  • The Manager will provide monitoring details to the Committee on an annual basis (demonstrating progress in implementation).
  • Appropriate training will be provided to assist with implementation.
  • Advice on the implementation of the specific policies will be available from the Manager and Committee.
  • Play Inclusion Project will adopt the best practice in the light of both internal and external research and experience.

Complaints

  • Any complaints made regarding inequality will be dealt with under the terms of the Complaints Policy, bearing in mind the safeguarding of individuals.
  • Any member of the Charity who suffers from unfair discrimination will have the support of the Management. Please refer to the Complaints Policy and Harassment Policy for further information.

First Aid Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project recognises the importance of providing adequate and appropriate first aid equipment and facilities for all children, staff, volunteers and visitors and will take all reasonable practical steps to fulfil our responsibility

Legislation

The Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 imposes a general duty on employers to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of all their employees, volunteers and service users. This extends to the provision of appropriate First Aid facilities.

Play Inclusion Project understands first aid to refer to:

I           The initial and appropriate management of illness or injury which aims to

preserve life or minimise the consequences of injury and illness until professional medical help can be obtained.

II          The treatment of minor injuries that do not require the attention of a medical practitioner or nurse.

The charity recognises that employers are required to make arrangements for first aid at work, to ensure that illness or injury at work is treated and managed in the most appropriate way.

First Aid Provision

Play Inclusion Project ensures that a qualified first aider is available at all times, including at all activities/clubs delivered.  First Aid signs are prominently displayed at the entrance informing staff, service users and visitors who the nominated First Aiders are for that day.

First Aid Box

All employees should have access to a First Aid Box whist at work.  The principal First Aid Box is carried by the Activity Coordinator who is responsible for checking its contents and ensuring that it is replenished when necessary.  The box should contain the following:

  • Guidance Book
  • Contents list
  • Medium sterile dressing
  • Large sterile dressing
  • Triangular bandage
  • Conforming bandage
  • Eye pad sterile dressing
  • Finger sterile dressing
  • Sterile adhesive plasters
  • Alcohol free moist cleaning wipes
  • Adhesive tape
  • Nitrile disposable gloves
  • Resuscitation face shield
  • Burn dressing
  • Assorted Safety Pins
  • Shears
  • Tweezers
  • Foil Blanket

Administering First Aid

  • Staff must wear PPE when administering First Aid
  • A face mask and visor should be worn by staff if a 2m distance cannot be maintained.
  • If a risk assessment determines that there is a risk of splashing to the eyes for example from coughing, spitting or vomiting, a face visor should also be worn

Record Keeping

All first aiders should ensure that a record is made of all first aid treatment they give.

This must include:

  • the date, time and place of the injury or illness occurring;
  • the name of the injured or ill person
  • details of the injury or illness and what first aid was given;
  • follow up advice given to parents/carers
  • the printed name of the first aider or person dealing with the casualty

All accident and incident forms are to be securely stored in the office and kept for a minimum of 20 years and 6 months.

Injuries at work are also covered by RIDDOR (the Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations 1995) and may require a report to be made to the Health & Safety Executive.

Serious Accidents

In the event of a serious accident, the Activity Coordinator will contact the ambulance service and request an ambulance. The child’s parents/carers will be informed as soon as possible. A member of staff will accompany the child to hospital if their parents are not available.

Parents are informed of any treatment administered by at the end of the day when they collect their child.  Parents will be contacted by telephone if deemed necessary and in all instances of a head injury.

Food and Drink Policy.

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project believes eating and preparing food should be an enjoyable experience.  Our aim is for mealtimes to be an enjoyable, sociable experience for all staff, volunteers, children and young people.

  • Each child and young person’s dietary requirements, food allergies and assistance required when eating or drinking are recorded on their individual care plan. Parents sign and date the care plan to signify the information is correct.
  • Parents are responsible for informing the Activity Coordinator of any changes to their child’s dietary needs and requirements.
  • During Activity Club children require a packed lunch each day, unless otherwise stated in the invite letter.
  • Play Inclusion Project does not have access to refrigeration facilities and parents/carers are asked to bear this in mind when selecting and preparing food.
  • Tables should be cleaned with anti-bacterial spray before lunch.
  • All children, young people and staff should wash their hands before eating.  This is especially important if staff are working with a child who requires support with eating.
  • Children should sit with their support worker and be 2m apart from the rest of the group whenever possible
  • Support staff will ensure the child they are supporting has collected their own lunch box and check other lunch boxes if they are supporting a child with a food allergy. Support staff will also help those that require assistance with eating their meal, this may include hand over hand feeding, placing small amounts of food in front of the child/young person or feeding a child.
  • Disposable gloves should be worn when support is needed with eating.
  • If a risk assessment determines that there is a risk of splashing to the eyes for example from coughing or spitting, a face visor should also be worn.
  • In order to protect children with food allergies we do not allow children or young people to swap or share foods with one another.
  • Staff will eat their lunch with the children and young people at mealtimes and will set a good example by encouraging table manners and promoting a positive atmosphere. Children and young people are encouraged to say please and thank you at all times.
  • Staff must not drink hot drinks or eat hot food such as soup around any of the children and young people.
  • Slow eaters will be given time to finish their meal and will never be rushed.
  • Parents/carers will be informed if their child has not eaten well.
  • Water will be made available to all children and young people throughout the day and any request for a drink will be responded to immediately.
  • All children who have dietary requirements or food allergies will be respected. Any cooking activities will be planned around individual dietary requirements.
  • On days that include a trip to McDonalds parents are required to provide their child with money to pay for it and must inform the support worker of what their child would like if they are not able to order for themselves.

Food Preparation

Only staff with the relevant food hygiene qualification will prepare food.

Personal Hygiene

  • Staff must wear appropriate protective clothing at all times when preparing food.
  • Children and young people helping with food preparation/food delivery must adhere to the above standard.
  • Food should be consumed in the room in which it was prepared wherever possible.
  • Sensible footwear should be worn, not open sandals.
  • One plain band wedding ring may be worn.
  • Small sleeper earrings or studs may be worn
  • Any other items of jewellery that cannot be removed must be covered with a blue plaster or blue gloves should be worn
  • The wearing of false nails, nail extensions and or nail varnish is not permitted.
  • The minimum expectation is that hair will be tied back irrespective of gender and no grips or clips should be worn.

As a matter of policy, hands should be washed in anti- bacterial soap and should take place:

  • before preparing food and after:
  • after going to the toilet.
  • after handling waste/ carrying out cleaning.
  • after blowing the nose or touching other parts of the body likely to harbour bacteria e.g. nose, mouth, hair, ears.

Anyone suffering bouts of sickness and/ or diarrhoea should be clear for 48 hours before working with food.

Gastrostomy Tube Feeding Policy

Policy Statement

Children and young people with disabilities might require help with eating and drinking or other aspects of intimate personal care

Play Inclusion Project is committed to ensuring that all staff responsible for gastrostomy tube feeding undertake their duties in a professional manner. Play Inclusion Project recognises that there is a need to treat all children and young people with respect.  No child should be attended to in a way that causes distress or pain.  A child’s welfare and dignity will always be of the highest priority.

All feeding requirements should be fully discussed with the child’s parents/carers and recorded on the child’s individual care plan.  Individual needs will be discussed during the home visit as part of the referral process.

Gastrostomy Tube Feeding Procedure

  • Gastrostomy Tube feeding should be carried out by a qualified member of staff who has had the appropriate training
  • Staff must wash hands thoroughly with soap and warm water and then apply PPE.  If a risk assessment determines that there is a risk of splashing to the eyes for example from coughing, spitting or vomiting, a face visor should also be reduce transmission of COVID-19.
  • Feeding should be carried out in a quiet area away from the rest of the group
  • The child/young person’s support worker should be present to witness the procedure in line with the safeguarding policy
  • Attach the tube to the stomach ensuring the air flow is locked off
  • Once the tube has been attached staff must ensure the child’s clothes are adjusted in order to respect their dignity
  • Flush the tube through with water, then give feed followed by another flush through with water (NB if the tube is a permanent peg water must be plunged in to clean the tube)
  • Parents/carers are required to provide all relevant feeding items required including tube, cooled boiled water and supplement feed
  • Lock of air flow and remove the tube from the stomach
  • Adjust clothes accordingly
  • Remove PPE
  • Record details on the Intimate Care Record Form
  • If the button falls out during the Activity Club day, apply PPE, replace it and cover with surgical tape.  If it falls on the floor wash it and replace it and cover with surgical tape.

Individual needs should be reviewed regularly with parents/carers and any amendments made to care plans where necessary.  Parents must sign and date care plans when amendments are made.

Health and Safety Policy

Policy Statement

The following is a statement of the charity’s health and safety policy in accordance with Section 2 of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974.

It is the policy of Play Inclusion Project to ensure so far as is reasonably practicable, the health, safety and welfare of all staff and volunteers working for the charity and other persons who may be affected by our undertakings.

Our health and safety policy is to:

  • Prevent accidents and work related ill-health
  • Manage health and safety risks in the workplace
  • Provide clear instructions, information and adequate training to ensure staff are competent enough to do their work
  • Provide personal protective equipment
  • Consult with staff on matters affecting their health and safety
  • Provide and maintain safe equipment
  • Ensure the safe handling and use of substances
  • Maintain safe and healthy working conditions
  • Implement emergency procedures including evacuation in case of fire or other significant incident
  • All personnel are made aware of their individual responsibilities
  • Employees/volunteers are given sufficient information, instruction, and training needed to maintain their health and safety at work
  • Equipment and ways of working are safe and without risk to health
  • Arrangements are made for the safe handling, storage and transport of articles and substances at work
  • Risk assessments are carried out and reports detailing the findings are made available to staff
  • All relevant health and safety legislation are complied with
  • The Management Committee expects all its employees and volunteers to assist in ensuring that the organisation can fulfil all its health and safety obligations by –
  • Working safely and efficiently
  • Reporting incidents that have led or may lead to accidents
  • Meeting company rules and procedures

Managerial organisation and responsibilities

This policy covers all employees and volunteers working for Play Inclusion Project in any of its offices and group settings.

Overall responsibility for health and safety lies with the board of trustees who are responsible for –

  • ensuring resources are adequate to maintain health and safety standards
  • ensuring the nominated employee carries out safety duties adequately
  • acting on reports and recommendations made by the nominated employee

The Charity Manager will be responsible for –

  • Ensuring all employees and trainees, paid or unpaid, receive adequate training
  • Ensuring that the Health and Safety policy is implemented, monitored and reviewed regularly
  • Working with the nominated person (Group Supervisor) in investigating all accidents and incidents and preparing the appropriate reports for the Management Committee
  • Making regular inspections of property, equipment and procedures, presenting reports on accidents, incidents and near misses to the Management Committee
  • Ensuring the Activity Coordinators carry out their duties as Health and Safety Officer adequately

The nominated employee will be responsible, on a day to day basis, for –

  • acting as the competent person under the act
  • carrying out risk assessments as required under current legislation
  • implementing the health and safety policy in co-operation with other staff
  • reporting accidents, incidents and near misses to the Manager
  • ensuring good housekeeping is maintained
  • maintaining records of –
    • accidents
    • fire drills
    • safety checks
    • nominated First Aid person in the centre
  • preparing, where appropriate, incident/accident reports as required by RIDDOR
  • maintaining up-to-date legislative information on Acts and Regulations
  • maintaining all certificates and registers required under relevant legislation
  • carrying out initial reviews of health and safety policy as requested by the Act
  • ensuring all new equipment or processes are introduced in line with regulations

All staff, trainees and volunteers will be responsible for –

  • co-operating with management on health and safety matters
  • taking reasonable care of their own health and safety
  • reporting all health and safety concerns to the Charity Manager
  • reporting accidents, incidents or near misses or any potential risks to the nominated worker

Compliance with the Health and Safety Policy is a condition of employment and breaches may be subject to disciplinary procedure.

This policy will be reviewed every two years, and amended after major changes to legislation, processes or equipment. The review will be carried out by the nominated Health and Safety Officer in consultation with all staff and be submitted to the Management Committee for approval.

Risk Assessments

  • Written risk assessment will be carried out where an unsafe condition or practice is identified
  • A competent person shall be appointed to carry out such an assessment
  • Play Inclusion Project will define and implement procedures for serious and imminent danger
  • Assessment will be carried out with employer/employee co-operation
  • Information will be made available to relevant workers
  • Risk assessments will be reviewed and if necessary updated annually.

Arrangements for Health and Safety

Risk Assessments

  • Written risk assessment will be carried out where an unsafe condition or practice is identified
  • A competent person shall be appointed to carry out such an assessment
  • Play Inclusion Project will define and implement procedures for serious and imminent danger
  • Assessment will be carried out with employer/employee co-operation
  • Information will be made available to relevant workers
  • Risk assessments will be reviewed and if necessary updated annually. 

Training

  • All new staff will be given health and safety induction and any relevant training
  • We will provide personal protective equipment
  • Training needs will be discussed at staff supervisions
  • Health and Safety training courses will be arranged as deemed necessary by the Management Committee to maintain a suitable level of ‘appointed person’
  • Prior to the introduction of any new equipment or change in work practices, the Management Committee will identify any new training requirements in consultation with the Chairperson

Reporting accidents

  • any person involved in an accident, whether or not injury is sustained must report to the Health and Safety Officer as soon as possible
  • any person receiving any injury – however slight – must report it and obtain adequate treatment
  • any person involved in a ‘near miss’ or dangerous occurrence must report this as soon as possible
  • any unsafe conditions or work activities should be reported to your line manager or nominated Health and Safety Officer

Working away

All relevant safety rules and legislation apply to all employees on Play Inclusion Project business away from the office

Fire/Emergency Arrangements

  • All staff must make themselves aware of evacuation plans in the event of fire or other emergency including bomb alert. A copy of the plan will be displayed
  • Staff will be issued with information as to locations of fire equipment and emergency exits – all staff are required to make themselves aware of these
  • Fire drills will be held on a regular basis – everyone is required to take part. The nominated person will keep a record of all drills.
  • All fire doors must be kept closed at ALL times
  • The nominated person will make regular checks to ensure that fire exits are kept clear and all safety notices will remain conspicuously displayed

General Code of Practice

  • Use equipment only for the purpose for which it was purchased – do not improvise
  • Use equipment with regard to the manufacturer’s instructions
  • Do not continue to use equipment if a fault develops – report it to your line manager
  • Never run cables under carpets, ensure suitable cable covers are used
  • Only use mullet-socket outlet adapters if a qualified electrician has checked these
  • Co-operate with other staff by maintaining good housekeeping, especially in your own work area
  • Filing cabinets drawers are to be kept closed at all times and filled from the bottom upwards – to prevent toppling
  • Staff working alone in the building must ensure the front door is locked
  • Solitary workers must ensure that they are not suffering from a medical condition that makes working alone unsafe
  • Staff working alone must never take personal risks eg overstitching or climbing on inappropriate surfaces

Staff/Volunteers visiting the homes of service users

The safety of all staff and volunteers is paramount

  • Staff visiting children at their homes must never take any personal risks
  • The details of appointments should be recorded on the weekly timesheet and handed to the Charity Manager
  • Staff on such visits should always inform relatives or friends of their intended whereabouts, giving a deadline for a check call
  • Play Inclusion Project asks that where relatives or friends are the contact, that they are made aware of the need for urgent action in this event
  • Staff who have a medical condition, which may affect their ability to work, should discuss this with their line manager/chairperson
  • Where accidents, near misses or dangerous occurrences take place whilst on Play Inclusion Project business, these should be reported as soon as possible to the nominated person who will enter them into the accident book
  • It is important that, on entering the homes of children, staff should guard against accidents occasioned by torn or frayed carpets, loose rugs and slippery floor surfaces or trailing cables and flexes
  • Care should be taken on unlit corridors or stairs

Code of Practice for VDU Users

  • Ensure that the screen is adjusted, with regard to brightness and contrast, to suit individual users
  • Users should take short but frequent breaks – ideally five to ten minutes in each hour – by varying the type of work done
  • Users may request free eye tests where use of the VDU is felt to cause an eye problem
  • Each user should ensure that their chair, desks VDU casings and keyboards are adjusted to suit
  • Use any PPE (person protective equipment) provided eg screen filters and footrest
  • Ensure there is no reflected light on the screen
  • Report any glare or flicker to the nominated person
  • Report any environmental or hardware problem which may be specific to a user to the nominated person
  • Risk assessments should be carried out when new equipment (including software) is installed

Manual Handling

  • When moving heavy items staff should have regard to Manual Handling techniques
  • Staff must take account of their individual capability and ask for assistance with heavy or bulky loads
  • Instructions for manual handling will be provided

Inclusion Policy

Policy Statement

All children are citizens and have rights and entitlements.  Children should be treated fairly, regardless of race, religion or abilities. This applies no matter:

  • what they think or say
  • what type of family they come from
  • what language(s) they speak
  • what their parents do
  • whether they are girls or boys
  • whether they have a disability or if they are rich or poor

All children have an equal right to be listened to and valued. Our activities are ‘inclusive activities’. This means that ALL children are welcome and will be respected. Children are given equal opportunities and we have a positive attitude towards diversity. We encourage children in our care to practice their own cultures as well as finding out about others.

Inclusion

All children are unique and have different support needs, Play Inclusion project will make every endeavour to meet those needs.  Individual support needs will be recorded in each child’s individual care plan. This information will be shared with parents and carers and we would appreciate any other information you can give us, which will assist us in meeting your child’s needs.

We have children of varying ages attending our activities and we have resources available for all age groups.  Children learn from each other and much of what we plan will include all age groups. Every effort will be made to make all of our activities inclusive regardless of a child’s disability.  Our volunteers and support staff are responsible for ensuring each child is included in planned activities, they will join in activities alongside the children and young people they support.

We endeavour to provide a safe and supportive environment which is free from harassment. We will challenge racial, religious, disability and gender stereotypes and all expressions of discrimination or prejudice. We value the fact that families are all different and that children may live with one or both parents, with other relatives or carers, with same sex parents or in an extended family.

 

Infection Control Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project is committed to protecting the health and well-being of all staff, volunteers and service users.  Infection control and safe working practices are of the utmost importance to Play Inclusion Project and are essential to providing high quality support for the children and young people who access our activities.

This document sets out the policy and procedure in relation to infection control

Purpose of the Policy

This policy aims to provide Play Inclusion Project’s trustees, staff, volunteers, children/young people and their families with guidance when preparing for, and in the event of an outbreak of an infection such as pandemic influenza, COVID-19 or any contagious illness.

Definitions

Infection requires three main elements — a source of the infectious agent, a mode of transmission and a susceptible host.

Infection control is preventing the transmission of infectious organisms and managing infections if they occur. Infectious agents are biological agents that cause disease or illness to their hosts.

Hand hygiene is a general term referring to any action of hand cleansing. It includes hand washing with soap and water and using hand sanitizer.

Respiratory hygiene or cough etiquette are terms used to describe infection prevention measures. Practices include:

  • covering the mouth and nose when coughing or sneezing
  • using tissues and disposing of them appropriately
  • attending to hand hygiene immediately after coughing, sneezing or blowing nose.

Contact transmission usually involves transmission of an infectious agent by hand or via contact with blood or body substances. Contact may be direct or indirect.

Direct contact transmission occurs when infectious agents are transferred from one person to another, for example, a child’s blood entering a support worker’s body through an unprotected cut in the skin.

Indirect contact transmission involves the transfer of an infectious agent through a contaminated intermediate object or person, for example, an employee touches an infected body site on a child and does not perform hand hygiene before touching another child

Standard precautions are work practices which require everyone to assume that all blood and body substances are potential sources of infection, independent of perceived risk.

Planning and preparing

In the event of Play Inclusion Project becoming aware that a child, volunteer or member of staff has an infectious illness we would direct their parents to report to their GP and inform the local PHE centre. During an outbreak of an infectious illness such as pandemic influenza or COVID-19 the Play inclusion project will seek to operate as normally as possible but will plan for higher levels of staff absence. The decision on whether activities and sessions should continue to run will be based on medical evidence.  If an infection illness results in there not being adequate staff to deliver activities safely, the Emergency Closure Policy procedure will be followed.

Infection control

Infections are usually spread from person to person by close contact, for example:

  • infected people can pass a virus to others through large droplets when coughing, sneezing or even talking within a close distance
  • through direct contact with an infected person e.g. shaking or holding hands then touching your hands, mouth, eyes or nose before washing your hands
  • by touching objects that have been touched by an infected person then touching your hands, mouth, eyes or nose before washing your hands
  • viruses can survive longer on hard surfaces than soft or absorbent surfaces

It is important that up to date information regarding any new virus is strictly adhered to.

Staff and children are given the following advice about how to reduce the risk of passing on infections to others:

  • Wash hands regularly, particularly after coughing, sneezing or blowing your nose.
  • Minimise contact between your hands and mouth/nose
  • Cover your nose and mouth when coughing and sneezing or in crook of elbow.
  • Do not attend activities if you have an infectious illness.

To control the spread of infection:

  • We ensure good handwashing procedures (toilet, handling animals, soil food)
  • Children encouraged to wipe and blow their own noses and dispose of soiled tissues in waste bins.
  • We wear protective clothing when dealing with accidents and incidents.
  • PPE is worn when carrying out first aid and attending to children’s intimate care needs

Cleaning of the environment

Cleaning throughout the setting is daily and thorough, including the cleaning of all toys and resources. All spillages of blood, faeces, saliva, vomit, nasal and eye discharges are cleaned up immediately with staff wearing PPE. When spillages occur, they are cleaned using a product that combines both a detergent and a disinfectant to be effective against bacteria and viruses and suitable for the surfaces used on. Mops are never used for cleaning up blood and body fluid spillages – disposable paper towels are used and waste is disposed in secure bins along with nappies. Double bag waste bin and remove to locked area for 72 hours before being placed with general waste.

Vulnerable children

Some of the children and young people who access our activities are more vulnerable to infections due to their complex health needs. Play Inclusion Project will have been made aware of such children and information regarding complex health needs will be recorded in the child’s individual care plan and, if necessary, an individual risk assessment will be completed. These children are particularly vulnerable to chickenpox, measles, COVID-19 or parvovirus B19 and, if exposed to these, then Activity Coordinators will contact the parent/carer and inform them promptly and further medical advice sought. In the event of a serious pandemic, a risk assessment and care plan for each vulnerable child will be drawn up. An assessment will be made, in partnership with parents as to whether the activities we deliver are a safe environment or whether the child should stay away.

Female staff – pregnancy

If a pregnant woman develops a rash or is in direct contact with someone with a potentially infectious rash, this should be investigated according to PHE guidelines by a doctor. The greatest risk to pregnant women from such infections comes from their own child/children, rather than the workplace. Some specific risks are:

  • Chicken Pox can affect the pregnancy if a woman has not already had the infection. Report exposure to midwife and GP at any stage of exposure. The GP and antenatal carer will arrange a blood test to check for immunity.
  • Shingles is caused by the same virus as chickenpox, so anyone who has not had chickenpox is potentially vulnerable to the infection if they have close contact with a case of shingles.
  • German Measles (rubella). If a pregnant women comes into contact with German Measles she should inform her GP and antenatal carer immediately, to ensure investigation. The infection may affect the developing baby if the woman is not immune and is exposed in early pregnancy.
  • Measles during pregnancy can result in early delivery or even loss of the baby. If a pregnant woman is exposed she should immediately inform whoever is giving antenatal care to ensure investigation.
  • Slapped Cheek Disease (parvovirus B19) can occasionally affect an unborn child. If exposed early in pregnancy (before 20 weeks), inform whoever is giving antenatal care, as this must be investigated promptly.
  • COVID-19 is a new virus and the impact on pregnant women and their baby is yet unknown.  If a pregnant woman comes into contact with someone with symptoms of COVID-19 she should contact their midwife, www.NHS.UK or contact the NHS via telephone on 119 for advice

Procedure for if a child, staff member or volunteer is displaying symptoms of an infectious illness

  • When a child or young person develops symptoms of an infectious illness whilst at a setting they will be isolated from the rest of the group and parents will be contacted immediately to arrange collection.
  • Parents will be expected to collect their child within 1 hour.
  • Staff or volunteer will be sent home immediately
  • The individual displaying symptoms will need to stay away until the illness has past and/or the recommended time as advised by Public Health England has past.

If an individual is displaying symptoms of COVID-19 the following additional measures must be taken:

  • Whilst a child is awaiting collection, they will be kept separately from others by a distance of at least 2 metres, where possible in a well-ventilated room with appropriate adult supervision.
  • PPE should be worn by staff waiting with the child whilst they await collection A face mask and visor should be worn by staff along with disposable apron and disposable gloves.
  • If they need to go to the bathroom whilst waiting to be collected, they should use a separate bathroom if possible.  Following use, the bathroom should be thoroughly cleaned and disinfected using standard cleaning products before anyone else uses it.
  • The child will be required to self-isolate for 7 days and parents/carers must arrange for them to have a test to see if they have coronavirus COVID-19.  Tests can be requested by visiting NHS.UK or contact NHS via telephone on 119.  Fellow household members will be required to self-isolate for 14 days.
  • If the child tests negative, they can return to sessions and fellow household members can end their self-isolation.
  • If the child tests negative but is unwell they must remain at home until they have recovered.
  • Where a child tests positive NHS Test and Trace will speak directly to those they have been in contact with to offer advice.  The advice may be that everyone at the session with the child should be sent home and self-isolate for 14 days.

The following are infectious illnesses that require exclusion

 

 

 

Infection/complaint

 

Recommended exclusion period

 

Comments

 

Chickenpox

 

Until vesicles have crusted over

 

See vulnerable children, female staff – pregnancy

 

COVID-19

 

Individual will be required to self-isolate for 14 days

 

See vulnerable children, female staff – pregnancy

 

E-Coli

 

 

48hrs from last bout of diarrhoea

 

Further exclusion may be required if child cannot practice good hygiene

 

German measles

 

4 days from onset of the rash

 

See vulnerable children, female staff – pregnancy

 

Hepatitis A

 

Exclude for 7 days after onset of jaundice

 

Contact public health England for advice

 

 

Impetigo

 

Until lesions are crusted and healed or 48 hours after starting antibiotics

 

 
 

Measles

 

4 days from onset of the rash

 

 
 

Meningitis

 

Until recovered

 

 
 

Mumps

 

 

Exclude for 5 days after onset of swelling

 

 
 

Scabies

 

 

Can return after 1st treatment

 

Household and close contacts require treatment

 

Scarlet fever

 

24 hours after starting antibiotics

 

Slapped cheek/fifth disease.  Parvovirus B19

 

Can return once rash has developed

 

See female staff-pregnancy

 

Shingles

 

Exclude only if rash is weeping and cannot be covered

 

4 days from onset of the rash

 

Vomiting/diarrhoea

 

 

48 hours after last bout

 

 

 

Whooping cough

 

Can return 5 days after start of antibiotic or after 21 days if untreated

 

 

Intimate Care Policy

Policy Statement

Intimate care covers areas of personal care which most people carry out for themselves, however some people are unable to do so because of having a disability. Children and young people with disabilities might require help with eating and drinking or other aspects of intimate personal care such as washing, dressing and toileting.

Play Inclusion Project is committed to ensuring that all staff responsible for the intimate care of children and young people will undertake their duties in a professional manner. We will ensure that all children and young people are treated with respect and dignity when intimate care is given.  No child should be attended to in a way that causes distress or pain.  A child’s welfare and dignity will always be of the highest priority.

It is recognised that members of staff responsible for carrying out intimate care are at an increased risk of allegations of abuse.  Staff who provide intimate care should have training in Safeguarding Children and moving and handling (if appropriate).   All staff carrying out intimate care have a responsibility to report any safeguarding concerns that arise from intimate care.

All intimate care needs should be fully discussed with the child’s parents/carers and recorded on the child’s individual care plan during the home visit.

Changing

A suitable room should be prepared to ensure intimate care needs can be provided for appropriately.

As a basic principle children and young people will be supported to achieve the highest level of autonomy that is possible given their ability. Staff will encourage and promote each child/young person’s independence, this may mean, for example, giving the child/young person responsibility for washing themselves or pulling clothes up/down.

Pad changing Procedure

  • At least two members of staff must be present when carrying out intimate care in line with Play Inclusion Project’s safeguarding policy and to assist with lifting and handling.
  • Staff must wash their hands for 20 seconds and then apply appropriate PPE including gloves, apron and face visor.
  • Place, lift or hoist the child onto the changing mat or changing table and undress.
  • If a child/young person can undress themselves, they must be encouraged to do so.
  • All staff must use the child’s own labelled pads and wipes to clean the child
  • Remove the soiled pad and ensure the child is thoroughly clean before applying a new pad
  • All wastage i.e. used nappies/pads, wipes, gloves and aprons will be disposed

of immediately into a nappy bag, tied and disposed of in the yellow bin provided.

  • Dress the child/ young person or encourage them to do this themselves
  • Wash hands with anti bacterial soap and warm water for 20 seconds.
  • Escort child from bathroom
  • Record details on Intimate Care Record Form
  • Staff member to use anti bacterial spray and paper towels to clean changing bed/mat that was used, ready for next child.

Wherever possible the same child should not be cared for by the same adult on a regular basis.  This will ensure that dependency on one person is discouraged

Record Keeping

Each time a child receives intimate care it must be recorded on the intimate care record form.  Care received along with the date must be recorded and both members of staff must sign the form.  Completed forms are to be handed to the Charity Manager for storage.

Manual Handling Policy

Policy Statement

Manual Handling Operations refers to any transporting or supporting of a load including the lifting, putting down, pushing, pulling carrying or moving thereof by hand or bodily force (manual Handling Operations Regulations, 1992).  There is a legal requirement for Play Inclusion Project to have a Health and Safety Policy that includes a Manual Handling Statement.  This policy reflects the values and ethos at Play Inclusion Project in relation to our responsibilities for ensuring the safe moving and handling of children and young people.

Manual Handling is frequently carried out by staff.  Play Inclusion Project will comply with legal requirements stated in:

  • Health and Safety at Work Act 1974
  • The manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992
  • All other legislation relating to manual handling
  • Manual Handling Policy

Employees have a legal duty to:

  • Avoid hazardous manual handling operations so far as is reasonably practicable
  • Assess any hazardous operations that cannot be avoided
  • Remove or reduce the risk of injury using the assessment as a basis for action

Manual Handling Guidelines

  • When moving and handling a child or young person with physical needs the health, safety and dignity of all those concerned is paramount.
  • When carrying out manual handling there must be a minimum of two members of staff involved in the process.
  • All manual handling that can be avoided should be avoided regardless of time or resource implications in accordance with a minimum lifting policy.
  • All manual handling that presents a risk to staff must be identified and a risk assessment carried out. The risk assessment will identify how the handling task should be correctly carried out.
  • Manual handling will only be carried out by qualified staff who have received the appropriate training.
  • Any manual handling accident or injury that occurs must be recorded and repeated as soon as possible using the Health and Safety accident procedures and forms.
  • Alternative methods of movement will be necessary for children and young people who cannot weight bear or assist with the handling process. This will include mobile or overhead hoists.

Hoisting Procedure

  • The use of hoists can reduce the risk of musculoskeletal risks however there can be a risk to service users who are being hoisted.
  • When hoisting children and young people staff must use the child’s/young person’s individual sling.
  • Prior to hoisting the Activity Coordinator should check that the slings the children and young people use are compatible with the hoist.
  • A minimum of two people must be involved in the hoisting of children and young people.
  • Ensure the environment is free from obstacles and the floor is free from hazards that could cause slips or trips.
  • Ensure the changing bed is clean and ready to safely receive the child/young person.
  • Children and young people should never be left unattended in a hoist or in a position where they may be at risk of falling from a changing bed, sling or wheelchair.
  • Reassure the child/young person during the hoisting process and involve them as much as possible.
  • Prior to raising a child/young person the Activity Coordinator must check the sling is positioned correctly and double check the sling attachments.
  • Hoist the chid/young person just above the surface from which they are being lifted to obtain sufficient clearance.
  • Check the sling is clearly attached to the hoist and the person is comfortable then lower the child/young person down into a safe position.

Additional Guidelines for Overhead Hoisting Systems

  • The motor should be directly overhead and the lifting tape is vertical to the lift to avoid wear and tear and/or malfunction.
  • Elevate the spreader bar to its highest possible position when not in use.
  • Return the hoist to its docking station when not in use for charging.
  • Ensure the tracking and pathway is clear of obstructions
  • Do not use the lifting tape to pull or drag the spreader bar as it may cause damage to the hoist.

Mobile Phone, Camera and Internet Policy

Policy Statement

At Play Inclusion Project we take steps to ensure that there are effective procedures in place to protect children, young people and vulnerable adults from the unacceptable use of mobile phones and cameras during the working day.

Play Inclusion Project recognises that Activity Coordinators will need to have access to mobile phones during the working day.

Ensuring the Safe and Appropriate Use of Mobile Phones

  • Personal mobile phones belonging to staff are not to be used on the premises during working hours.
  • Under no circumstances should mobiles be taken into the classrooms, sports hall, changing areas or toilets.
  • The Activity Coordinators will have to keep their personal mobile phone on their person for emergency reasons, particularly on trip days. However, supervisors should not be making or receiving personal calls during work hours.
  • Members of staff should not use their personal mobiles to take photographs of children or young people whilst on outings or within the setting.
  • All staff are advised to give relatives the Activity Coordinators contact number so they can be contacted in case of emergency.
  • In case of emergency personal mobile phones may be used in designated areas, with permission from the Activity Coordinator.

 Camera Policy

  • Staff must not bring their own camera or recording equipment to the group.
  • Under no circumstances are pictures or recordings to be taken other than those taken using the Play Inclusion Project camera.
  • Activity Coordinators should ensure that the camera is returned to the office when not in use and kept locked away.
  • Photographs or recordings will only be taken of those children and young people whose parents/carers have signed the relevant social media consent form.
  • Camera use will be monitored by the Activity Coordinator.
  • Photographs taken will be used as part of a planned activity or for promotional purposes only.

Internet Policy

As part of Play Inclusion Project’s safeguarding policy all staff and volunteers must refrain from talking about settings, staff, children, young people, families, volunteers and Project Workers on any social networking sites.

 

Play Inclusion Project strongly discourages any contact between volunteers and children and young people via social networking sites.

 

Safeguarding Children and Vulnerable Adult’s Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project works with children and families as part of its activities. These include the planning and delivery of weekly leisure activities and Activity Clubs during school holiday periods.

The purpose of this policy statement is:

  • to protect children and young people who receive Play Inclusion Project’s services. This includes the children of adults who use our services
  • to provide parents, staff and volunteers with the overarching principles that guide our approach to child protection.

This policy statement applies to anyone working on behalf of Play Inclusion Project, including senior managers and the board of trustees, paid staff, volunteers, sessional workers, agency staff and students.

Legal framework

This policy has been drawn up on the basis of legislation, policy and guidance that seeks to protect children in England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Play Inclusion Project believes that it is always unacceptable for a child or young person to experience abuse of any kind and recognises its responsibility to safeguard the welfare of all children and young people, by a commitment to practice which protects them.

Working Together 2015 defines safeguarding and promoting children’s welfare as:

  • Protecting children from maltreatment
  • Preventing impairment of children’s health or development
  • Ensuring children are growing up in circumstances consistent with the provision of safe and effective care
  • Taking action to enable all children to have the best life chances

We believe that:

  • children and young people should never experience abuse of any kind
  • we have a responsibility to promote the welfare of all children and young people, to keep them safe and to practise in a way that protects them.

We recognise that:

  • the welfare of the child is paramount
  • all children, regardless of age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex, or sexual orientation have a right to equal protection from all types of harm or abuse
  • some children are additionally vulnerable because of the impact of previous experiences, their level of dependency, communication needs or other issues
  • working in partnership with children, young people, their parents, carers and other agencies is essential in promoting young people’s welfare.

We will seek to keep children and young people safe by:

  • valuing, listening to and respecting them
  • appointing a nominated child protection/safeguarding lead, a deputy child protection/safeguarding lead and a lead trustee/board member for safeguarding
  • developing child protection and safeguarding policies and procedures which reflect best practice
  • using our safeguarding procedures to share concerns and relevant information with agencies who need to know, and involving children, young people, parents, families and carers appropriately
  • creating and maintaining an anti-bullying environment and ensuring that we have a policy and procedure to help us deal effectively with any bullying that does arise.
  • developing and implementing an effective online safety policy and related procedures
  • sharing information about child protection and safeguarding best practice with children, their families, staff and volunteers via leaflets, posters, group work and one-to-one discussions
  • recruiting staff and volunteers safely, ensuring all necessary checks are made
  • providing effective management for staff and volunteers through supervision, support, training and quality assurance measures
  • implementing a code of conduct for staff and volunteers
  • using our procedures to manage any allegations against staff and volunteers appropriately
  • ensuring that we have effective complaints and whistleblowing measures in place
  • ensuring that we provide a safe physical environment for our children, young people, staff and volunteers, by applying health and safety measures in accordance with the law and regulatory guidance
  • recording and storing information professionally and securely

All volunteers and staff are only accepted once a satisfactory enhanced level Disclosure and Barring Service clearance and two personal references have been received.

To safeguard the children and vulnerable adults we work with and to protect volunteers and staff against allegations they are never to be left alone with a child or vulnerable adult, this includes travelling arrangements and at all times during group sessions.

Definitions of Abuse

Child abuse is the term used when an adult harms a child or young person under the age of 18. Child abuse can take four forms, all of which can have long term adverse effects on children.

Physical Abuse

A form of abuse which may involve hitting, shaking, throwing, poisoning, burning or scalding, drowning, suffocating or otherwise causing physical harm to a child.  Physical harm may also be caused when a parent/carer fabricates the symptoms of or deliberately induces illness to a child.

(Working Together 2013:85)

Emotional Abuse

The persistent emotional maltreatment, of a child such as to cause severe and persistent adverse effects on the child’s emotional development.  It may involve conveying to children that they are worthless or unloved, inadequate or valued only insofar as they meet the needs of another person.  It may include not giving the child opportunities to express their views, deliberately silencing them or making fun of what they say or how they communicate.  It may feature age or developmentally inappropriate expectations being imposed on children.  These may include interactions that are beyond the child’s developmental capability as well as over-protection and limitation of exploration and learning, or preventing the child participating in normal social interaction.  It may involve seeing or the ill-treatment of another.  It may involve serious bullying (including cyber-bullying) causing children to frequently feel frightened or in danger, or the exploitation or corruption of children.

Some level of emotional abuse is involved in all types of maltreatment of a child, though it may occur alone.

(Working Together 13:85-86)

Sexual Abuse

Involves forcing or enticing a child or young person to take part in sexual activities, not necessarily involving a high level of violence, whether or not the child is aware of what is happening.  The activities may involve physical contact, including assault by penetration e.g. rape or oral sex or non-penetrative acts such as masturbation, kissing, rubbing, and touching inside clothing.  They may also include non-contact activities such as involving children looking at, or in the production of sexual images, watching sexual activities, encouraging children to behave in sexually inappropriate ways or grooming a child in preparation for abuse (including over the internet).  Sexual abuse is not solely perpetrated by adult males.  Women can also commit acts of sexual abuse as can other children.

(Working Together 13:86)

Neglect

The persistent failure to meet a child’s basic physical and/or psychological needs, likely to result in the serious impairment of the child’s health and development.  Neglect may occur during pregnancy as a result of maternal substance misuse.  Once a child is born neglect may involve a parent or carer failing to:

  • provide adequate food, clothing and shelter (including exclusion from home or abandonment)
  • protect a child from physical or emotional harm or danger
  • ensure adequate supervision (including the use of inadequate care takers) or
  • ensure access to appropriate medical care or treatment

It may also include neglect of, or unresponsiveness to a child’s basic emotional needs.

(Working Together 13:86)

Child Sexual Exploitation

Child sexual exploitation is a form of child sexual abuse. It occurs where an individual or group takes advantage of an imbalance of power to coerce, manipulate or deceive a child or young person under the age of 18 into sexual activity (a) in exchange for something the victim needs or wants, and/or (b) for the financial advantage or increased status of the perpetrator or facilitator. The victim may have been sexually exploited even if the sexual activity appears consensual. Child sexual exploitation does not always involve physical contact; it can also occur through technology.

Indicators of Possible Abuse

Concern may be felt because a child or vulnerable adult:

  • Has an unexplained and/or suspicious injury or one for which the explanation seems inconsistent.
  • Describes what appears to be an abusive act involving them or is the subject of an allegation by another person.
  • Displays unexplained changes in behaviour.
  • Displays inappropriate sexual awareness engages in sexually explicit behaviour in games or masturbates.
  • Suffers from urinary tract infection.
  • Is distrustful of adults, particularly those with whom a close relationship would normally be expected.
  • Has few, if any, friends and/or is prevented from socialising with other children or vulnerable adults.
  • Appears to be suffering from impaired development.
  • Displays variation in eating patterns or loses weight for no apparent reason.
  • Develops a disturbed sleeping pattern – nightmares, bedwetting/soiling.
  • Harms, or attempts to harm themselves, including running away.

This list is not exhaustive and a presence of one or more of the above is not proof that abuse has taken place.

Play Inclusion Project recognises that its volunteers are not experts in recognising when abuse may have taken place, and therefore requires volunteers to discuss any concerns they may have with group supervisors who will then assume responsibility for the matter and report issues of concern to the Designated Safeguarding Lead (DSL).

Equality Statement

Play Inclusion Project will ensure all children and young people receive the same protection from abuse regardless of age, disability, gender, racial heritage, religious belief, sexual orientation or any other characteristic protected by law.

Play Inclusion project recognises that some children, including those with disabilities are particularly vulnerable to abuse.

Safeguarding children and young people with disabilities

Children with disabilities are at greater risk of abuse, research suggests that children with disabilities across the range of impairments are at a significantly higher risk of all forms of abuse.  It is difficult to report abuse and children with disabilities including those who are deaf, with speech, language and communication needs face extra barriers.

Messages about abuse and how to stay safe are not always accessible to children with disabilities, including those who are deaf also they may:

  • receive intimate personal care from a number of carers increasing the risk of exposure to abuse
  • have an impaired capacity to resist/avoid abuse
  • be inhibited about reporting abuse out of fear of losing services
  • be vulnerable to bullying & intimidation
  • be more vulnerable to abuse by their peers

Additional forms of abuse

Children with disabilities are three times more likely to suffer from abuse and are also at risk of being abused in other ways for example:

  • physical restraint being carried out unnecessarily
  • rough handling e.g. disproportionate use of force
  • misuse of medication
  • personal care needs not being adequately met e.g. a child who soils being left in unhygienic conditions
  • force feeding or inappropriate feeding e.g. not using prescribed food
  • extreme behaviour modification e.g. limiting movement or restricting freedoms (being left in wheel chair for long period)

Difficulties in recognising abuse of children and young people with disabilities

There are a number of factors that can make it difficult to recognise the abuse of children with disabilities.  Professionals rely on parents and carers to facilitate communication; this poses a risk if a child is being abused by a parent/carer or if the adult they are communicating with does not believe the child.

Some children or young people may be dependent on their abuser or their abuser may be the main person they communicate with again making it difficult for abuse to be reported.

Some behaviour which indicate abuse is also common behaviour in children with disabilities e.g. lack of appetite can be due to medication or shying away from physical contact, also some children behave in ways which are self-harming making it difficult to recognise if abuse is taking place.

Responding to a Disclosure

If a child or vulnerable adult discloses information that causes concern all staff and volunteers must follow the procedure below –

  • Respond calmly so as not to frighten the child or vulnerable adult.
  • Take what the child or vulnerable adult says seriously, recognising that there may be difficulties in interpreting what a child or vulnerable adult who has speech impairment or difficulty with language and communication is saying.
  • Do not ask any questions or make any notes but never stop them talking.
  • Reassure the child or vulnerable adult, but do not make promises of confidentiality.
  • Contact the designated safeguarding officer within two hours and allow them to take responsibility for contacting Social Services.
  • If you cannot contact the designated officer you have a duty of care in relation to safeguarding and must contact social services directly and report your concerns.
  • Make a careful record of what has been said, stating who was present, the time, date and place.  Be factual, state exactly what was said using the child’s words wherever possible.

Staff and volunteers should never:

  • Do nothing
  • Make promises of confidentiality
  • Investigate or seek to prove/disprove allegations
  • Confront another person (adult or child) allegedly involved
  • Assume that another agency or professional will act or is acting
  • Offer opinions about what is being said or the persons allegedly involved
  • Fail to discuss concerns with the designated Safeguarding Officer
  • Attempt to resolve the matter themselves
  • Forget to record what you have been told

Contact Numbers

 

Play Inclusion Project Office

 

01253 899883

 

Designated safeguarding Officer –

Joanne Barnes

 

07867783406

 

Lancashire Social Services

0300 123 6720(8.00 am– 8. 00pm)

 

0300 123 6722 (out of hours Duty Team)

 

Blackpool Social Services

 

01253 477299

 

Emergency services

 

999 ( if a child is at immediate risk call the police)


Safeguarding Procedure

  • Once any suspicion, allegation or incident of abuse has been reported to project staff they should, within two hours report it to the DSL, Joanne Barnes. If the DSL is unavailable the group supervisor must directly report the incident to social services.
  • Where necessary the DSL will report the concern to social services and follow up in writing within 24 hours.
  • An incident report form must be completed within 24 hours. This will be filed securely in the Incident Report file in the Charity Manager’s office.
  • Any volunteer or member of staff has the right to contact social services or the police. Where it is necessary to ensure the safety of the child or        vulnerable adults or others and where the DSL is unavailable or where it is in the best interests of the service user, then social services or the police should be called immediately.
  • Play Inclusion Project has a commitment to work in partnership with parents and carers and to share with them all concerns relating to their children. There are, however, circumstances in which a child or vulnerable adult might be placed at even greater risk were such concerns to be shared. The DSL, after consultation with the Charity Manager, Social Services and the Police is responsible for deciding whether the parents should be informed.  In the case of suspicion or disclosure of sexual abuse committed by somebody known to the family the parents must not be informed.
  • When a child/vulnerable adult protection referral is made, Social Services have a responsibility to investigate. While the investigation is taking place, Play Inclusion Project retains its responsibility to safeguard and promote the welfare of the child or vulnerable adult.  Although it is always necessary to be sensitive to the wishes of children or vulnerable adults there is a duty to report concerns or suspicions of abuse that put at risk the safety of the child, vulnerable adult or others, particularly if the allegation involves an employee or volunteer.
  • If a child protection conference is convened, any representative from Play Inclusion Project must have the authority to make decisions, including acceptance of child and/or family support roles.
  • If the child or young person’s name is entered on the child protection register, the name, address and telephone number of the key worker appointed by the child protection conference must be recorded on the child’s personal file.

It is not Child Protection but I am still Concerned

If you have concerns regarding a child or young person but the concern does not meet the threshold to be a Child Protection issue, for example if there are concerns that a child or family need extra help in making sure the all the child’s needs are met due to experiencing poverty or where a child is getting into trouble in the community, help can be sought using the Common Assessment Framework.

Safeguarding Concerns/Allegations Regarding Play Inclusion Project Staff and/ or Volunteers

All staff and volunteers should follow the policy of never being left alone with a child or young person at any time

  • In the case of allegations being made against a staff member the procedures as outlined above must be followed.  The Charity Manager should discuss this matter with the staff member and make detailed notes.  At this stage the source of concern does not need to be named though they may already know.
  • In the case of an allegation being made against the Charity Manager or Management members, staff should voice their concerns with Chair of the Trustees.
  • Play Inclusion Project recognises that reporting on colleagues is difficult, but everyone has a duty of care in relation to safeguarding children. The safety and welfare of service users is of primary concern. It is better to report a suspicion and be wrong than not report it at all.
  • The Charity Manager and Board of Trustees will support any member of staff who reports their suspicions in good faith. All matters will be treated seriously and managers should ensure that volunteers and staff feel comfortable in raising concerns
  • If an allegation is made against a member of staff it may be that the staff member will be suspended to protect both the vulnerable service users and members of staff and to allow an investigation to be carried out as quickly as possible.
  • Everyone should be aware that suspension of those who have contact with a suspected victim of abuse is not unusual. It does not imply that any disciplinary action will follow or that there are any particular suspicions about a particular member of staff.
  • Management may be reassured that no abuse has occurred but more general issues of good practice may have been highlighted by an incident and these will be addressed.
  • Discussion with staff regarding bad practice should be recorded in their employee files.  Other appropriate people must be informed.
  • All staff should receive awareness training about Safeguarding Children and the procedures to be followed.

Responsibilities
Play Inclusion Project will ensure that safeguarding concerns or allegations against adults working for the charity are referred the local authority for advice, and that any member of staff found not suitable to work with children will be notified to the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS) for consideration for barring, following resignation, dismissal, or when we cease to use their service as a result of a substantiated allegation, in the case of a volunteer.

The DSL is responsible for:

  • Referring a child if there are concerns about possible abuse, to the Local Authority, and acting as a focal point for staff to discuss concerns. Referrals should be made in writing, following a telephone call using the Multi Agency Referral Form (MARF)
  • Keeping written records of concerns about a child even if there is no need to make an immediate referral.
  • Ensuring that all such records are kept confidentially in line with GDPR
  • Liaising with other agencies and professionals.
  • Ensuring that either they or the relevant Project Worker attends case conferences, core groups, or other multi-agency planning meetings, contribute to assessments, and provide a report which has been shared with the parents.

Safer Recruitment of Staff

Policy Statement

At Play Inclusion Project we are committed to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of all children and young people in our care.  As an employer, we expect all staff and volunteers to share this commitment.  Our safer recruitment policy ensures that appropriate checks are made on all potential staff and volunteers who will come into contact with children, as part of a transparent and equitable recruitment process.

Guiding Principles

  • If a member of staff involved in the recruitment process has a close personal or familial relationship with an applicant they must declare it as soon as they are aware of the individual’s application.
  • They must then avoid any involvement in the recruitment and selection decision-making process for the position.

Objectives of This Policy

  • To deter, reject or identify people who might abuse students or are otherwise unsuited to working with them by having appropriate procedures for appointing staff.
  • To recruit the best candidate for the job, ensuring all job applicants are considered equitably and consistently based on abilities, qualifications, experience and merit as measured against the job description and the person specification.
  • To conduct the recruitment and selection of staff in a professional, timely and responsible manner and in compliance with current employment legislation

Recruitment and Selection Procedure

Advertising

  • To ensure equality of opportunity, Play Inclusion Project will advertise all vacant posts to encourage as wide a field of applicant as possible. Normally this entails an external advertisement.
  • Any advertisement will make clear our commitment to safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children.
  • All documentation relating to applicants will be treated confidentially.

Job Descriptions and Person Specifications

  • A job description and person specification is a key document in the recruitment process and a copy will be provided to applicants along with their application form.
  • The job description will clearly and accurately set out the duties and responsibilities of the job role.
  • The person specification will set out the skills, experience, qualifications and personal attributes required for the role.

Application

  • All applicants are required to complete Play Inclusion Project’s application form (online or hard copy).  The application form will include the applicant’s declaration regarding criminal convictions and working with children.
  • C.V.s will not be accepted in place of a completed application form.
  • All applicants must advise of any gaps in their employment history and provide reasons for these gaps.
  • All applicants will be made aware that providing false information is an offence and could result in the application being rejected or summary dismissal if the applicant has been selected, and possible referral to the police and other professional regulatory bodies.
  • All applications will be viewed by the Charity Manager and a trustee and will be scored against the Job Description and the Person Specification.
  • The highest scoring applicants will be invited for a formal interview with the trustees and the Charity Manager.

Offer of Employment

If it is decided to make an offer of employment following the formal interview, any such offer will be conditional on the following:

  • the receipt of two references (one of which must be from the applicant’s most recent employer).
  • the receipt of a satisfactory enhanced disclosure from the Disclosure and Barring Service.
  • copies of qualifications and proof of identity.

A personal file will be used to track and audit paperwork obtained in relation to the recruitment process.

If the above conditions are satisfied and the offer is accepted, the applicant will be offered employment and a start date will be confirmed.

Pre-employment checks

In accordance with the recommendations of the DfES in “Safeguarding Children: Safer Recruitment and Selection in Education Settings” the Charity carries out a number of pre employment checks in respect of all prospective employees

Verification of identity and address

All applicants who are invited to an interview will be required to bring the following evidence of identity, address and qualifications:

  • current driving licence or passport or full birth certificate; and
  • two utility bills or statements (from different sources) showing their name and home  address
  • documentation confirming their National Insurance Number (P45, P60 or National Insurance Card)
  • documents confirming any educational and professional qualifications referred to in their application form.

Where an applicant claims to have changed his/her name by deed poll or any other mechanism (e.g. marriage, adoption, statutory declaration) he/she will be required to provide documentary evidence of the change.

References

All offers of employment will be subject to the receipt of a minimum of two satisfactory references, one of which must be from the applicant’s current or most recent employer. If the current/most recent employment does/did not involve work with children, then the second referee should be from the employer with whom the applicant most recently worked with children. A referee will not be accepted if they are a relative.

All referees will be asked whether they believe the applicant is suitable for the job for which they have applied and whether they have any reason to believe that the applicant is unsuitable to work with children. All referees will be sent a copy of the job description and person specification for the role which the applicant has applied for. If the referee is a current or previous employer, they will be asked

  • whether the applicant has ever been the subject of disciplinary procedures involving issues related to the safety and welfare of children (including any in which the disciplinary sanction has expired)
  • whether any allegations or concerns have been raised about the applicant that relate to the safety and welfare of children or young people or behaviour towards children or young people.

Play Inclusion Project will only accept references obtained directly from the referee on the official form with all sections completed. It will not rely on references or testimonials provided by the applicant or on open references or testimonials.  The Charity Manager will compare all references with any information given on the application form. Any discrepancies or inconsistencies in the information will be taken up with the applicant before any appointment is confirmed.

All references received will be verified via telephone.

DBS Checks

All prospective volunteers and staff must undergo an Enhanced Level Disclosure and Barring Service check following an informal interview.

Applicants will be asked to disclose any non-conviction information that may be related to their suitability for the role they have applied for.

Dealing with convictions

  • Play Inclusion Project operates a formal procedure if a DBS check is returned with details of convictions. Consideration will be given to:
    • the nature, seriousness and relevance of the offence
    • how long ago the offence occurred
    • one-off or history of offences
    • changes in circumstances
    • rehabilitation and remorse
  • A formal meeting will take place face-to-face to establish the facts with the Charity Manager. A decision will be made following this meeting.

Retention and security of disclosure information

Play Inclusion Project’s policy is to observe the guidance issued or supported by the DBS on the use of disclosure information. In particular, Play Inclusion Project will:

  • store disclosure information and other confidential documents issued by the DBS in locked, non-portable storage containers, access to which will be restricted to countersignature staff only.
  • not retain disclosure information or any associated correspondence for longer than is necessary. In most cases, Play Inclusion Project will not retain such information for longer than 6 months although we will keep a record of the date of a disclosure, the name of the individual, the type of disclosure, the position in question, the unique number issued by the DBS and the recruitment decision taken.
  • ensure that any disclosure information is destroyed by suitably secure means such as shredding.

Retention of records

If an applicant is appointed, Play Inclusion Project will retain any relevant information provided on their application form (together with any attachments) on their personal file. If the application is unsuccessful, all documentation relating to the application will be destroyed after six months.

Social Networking Policy

Policy Statement

Social media can bring significant benefits to Play Inclusion Project, particularly from building relationships with current and potential service users.

However, it is important that employees who use social media within the charity do so in a way that enhances the charity’s prospects.  A misjudged status update can generate complaints or damage the charity’s reputation.  There are also security and data protection issues to consider.

This policy outlines how social media can be used safely and effectively.

Policy Scope

This policy applies to all employees, volunteers, committee members and contractors at Play Inclusion Project who use social media whilst working – no matter whether for business or personal reasons.  It applies no matter whether that social media use takes place on company premises, whilst travelling for business, delivering activities or whilst working from home.

Social media sites and services include but are not limited to:

  • Popular social networks like Facebook and Twitter
  • Online review websites like Reevoo and Trustpilot
  • Sharing and discussion sites like Delicious and Reddit
  • Photographic social networks like Instagram and Flickr
  • Question and answer social networks like Yahoo Answers and Quora
  • Professional social networks like LinkedIn

Responsibilities

Play Inclusion Project has a firm commitment to safeguarding children and young people in all aspects of its work. This policy has been written to set out the key principles and code of conduct that we expect of all employees, volunteers and service users in respect to their responsibilities in relation to the use of social networking sites. Everyone who operates Play Inclusion Project’s social media accounts has a responsibility for implementing this policy.

General Social Media Guidelines

Play Inclusion Project recognises that social media offers a platform for the charity to perform marketing, stay connected with families and build its profile online.  Social media is also an excellent way for staff to make useful connections, share ideas and shape discussions.

Basic Advice

Regardless of which social networks employees are using, or whether they are using personal or business accounts, following these simple rules helps avoid the most common pitfalls:

  • Know the social network. Employees should spend time becoming familiar with the site before contributing.  It is important to read any FAQs and understand what is and is not acceptable on a network before posting updates and messages.
  • If unsure, don’t post it.  Staff should err on the side of caution when posting to social media sites.  If an employee feels an update or message might cause offence or generate complaints – or be otherwise unsuitable – they should not post it.  Staff members can always consult the Charity Manager for advice.
  • Be thoughtful and polite.  Many social media users have gotten into trouble simply by failing to observe basic good manners online.  Employees should adopt the same level of courtesy used when communicating via email.
  • Look out for security threats.  Employees should be on guard for social engineering and phishing attempts.  Social networks are also used to distribute spam and malware.
  • Don’t make promises without checking.  Some social networks are very public so employees should not make any commitments or promises on behalf of Play Inclusion Project without checking the charity can deliver on the promises.  Enquiries can be directed to the Charity Manager.
  • Handle complex queries via other channels.  Social networks are not a good place to handle complex enquiries and service user issues.  Once a service user has made contact, employees should handle further communications via the most appropriate channel – usually via email or telephone.
  • Don’t escalate things.  It’s easy to post a quick response to a contentious status and then regret it.  Employees should always take the time to think before responding, and hold back if they are in any doubt at all.

Use of Company Social Media Accounts 

This part of the policy covers all use of social media accounts owned and run by Play Inclusion Project.

Authorised users

Only people who have been authorised to use Play Inclusion Project’s social media accounts may do so.

Authorisation is provided by the Charity Manager.  Allowing only designated people to use the accounts ensures the charity’s social media presence I consistent and cohesive.

Creating Social Media Accounts

New social media accounts in the charity’s name must not be created unless approved by the Charity Manager.

The charity operates it’s social media presence in line with a strategy that focuses on the most appropriate social networks, given available resources.

If there is a case to be made for opening a new account, employees should raise this with the Charity Manager.

Inappropriate Content and Uses

Play Inclusion Project’s social media accounts must not be used to share or spread inappropriate content or to take part in any activities that could bring the charity into disrepute.

When sharing an interesting blog post, article, photo or update, employees should always review the content thoroughly and should not post a link based solely on the headline.

Safe, Responsible Social Media Use

It is important to protect all staff, volunteers and service users from allegations and misinterpretations which can arise from the use of social networking sites.  Users must not:

  • State on personal social media accounts that they work for Play Inclusion Project.
  • Create or transmit material that might be defamatory or incur liability for the charity
  • Post messages or status updates or links to material or content that is inappropriate.
  • Inappropriate content includes: pornography, racial or religious slurs, gender specific comments, information encouraging criminal skills, activity or terrorism, materials relating to gambling, cults or illegal drugs.
  • Inappropriate material and content also covers any text, images or other media that that could reasonably offend someone on the grounds of race, age, gender, religious or political belief, disability, sexual orientation or any other characteristic protected by law.
  • Use social media for any illegal or criminal activities
  • Send offensive or harassing material to others via social media.
  • Broadcast unsolicited views on social. Political, religious or other non-business related matters.
  • Send or post messages, photographs or material that could damage Play Inclusion Project’s image or reputation.
  • Interact with Play Inclusion Project’s competitors in any way that could be interpreted as being offensive, rude or disrespectful.
  • Discuss colleagues, competitors, service users, volunteers or suppliers without their approval.
  • Post, upload or link to spam, junk email or chain mail and messages.
  • Post images or updates of service users who have not given consent via the social media consent form.
  • Post any images of employees, children, young people, volunteers or committee members or anyone else connected with Play Inclusion Project whilst engaged in any activity relating to the charity e.g. at weekly groups, on Activity Clubs, fund raising events etc on personal social media accounts

Safeguarding

  • Anyone working or volunteering for the Play Inclusion Project must not communicate with children or young people via social networking sites. Any communication received from a child or young person should be reported to the safeguarding officer.
  • If any member of staff or volunteers are aware of any inappropriate communications involving a child or young person on social networking sites it must be reported immediately to the Charity Manager.
  • Any child or young person accessing social networking sites whist attending a Play Inclusion Project funded activity must be supervised at all times by a support worker or volunteer to ensure no inappropriate material is viewed or posted.
  • Staff and volunteers must not use their personal social media accounts to communicate with service users.

Copyright

Play Inclusion Project respects and operates within copyright laws. Users may not use social media to:

  • Publish or share any copyrighted software, media or materials owned by third parties, unless permitted by that third party.
  • Share links to illegal copies of music, film, games or other software.

If staff wish to share content published on another website, they are free to do so if that website has obvious sharing buttons or functions on it.

Play Inclusion Project does not permit the use of the charity’s name, logo or any other published material on social networking sites, other than those run by the charity this includes any published material including the internet or written documentation.

Security and Data Protection

Employees should be aware of the security and data protection issues that can arise from using social media networks.

Maintain confidentiality

Users must not disclose any confidential or business sensitive information or the disclosure of information or images that could compromise Play Inclusion Project.

Employees are to be aware of the potential of online identity fraud and to be cautious when giving out personal information about themselves which may compromise their personal safety and security.

Potential Sanctions

In instances where there has been a breach of this policy the following will apply:

  • Any breaches of this policy will be fully investigated. Where it is found that there has been a breach of the policy this may result in action being taken under the Disciplinary Procedure. A breach of this policy will be considered to be a serious disciplinary offence which is also contrary to Play Inclusion Project’s ethos and principles.
  • The Charity will take appropriate action in order to protect the club’s reputation and that of its employees, volunteers, service users and anyone else directly linked to the charity.

Uncollected Child Policy

  • Parents of children who are still at a group 15 minutes after their usual collection time should be telephoned for information.
  • If there is no reply, alternative emergency contact numbers should be called.
  • If all other children have been collected, two staff should remain with the child until a parent arrives.
  • The child should be reassured and taken to a room where staff can keep them occupied until the parent or carer arrives.
  • If there is no communication with the expected collector and 1 hour has elapsed without information or contact with any of the given emergency numbers, Social Services should be called for advice.

Recruitment of Individuals with a Criminal Record Policy

Policy Statement

The policy objective of Play Inclusion Project on disclosure information is:

  • To ensure that disclosure information is used fairly in the recruitment process
  • To prevent discrimination against staff, volunteers, service users, potential employees and ex-offenders on the basis of conviction or other details.
  • To maximise protection for children, young people and other vulnerable people against those who might wish to harm them.

Play Inclusion Project assesses applicants’ suitability for positions which are included in the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) Order using criminal record checks processed through the Disclosure and Barring Service (DBS). Play Inclusion Project complies fully with the DBS Code of Practice and undertakes to treat all applicants for positions fairly.

Play Inclusion Project will ensure that any criminal record information given by an individual is kept confidential and according to the requirements of the Data Protection Act and, where appropriate, the Disclosure and Barring Service Code of Practice.

Recruitment

All recruitment follows Play Inclusion Project’s policies and procedures.

Advertisements and application forms

  • for positions where a DBS check is required, all adverts, application forms and supporting documentation will contain a statement that a DBS check will be required in the event of a person being conditionally offered a position
  • all application forms contain the following or similar statement: having a criminal record will not necessarily bar you from working with Play Inclusion Project. This will depend on the nature of the position and the circumstances and background of your offences
  • Play Inclusion Project’s Equal Opportunities Policy and Recruitment Policy for People with Criminal Records will be made available, on request, to all applicants at the start of the recruitment process.

Selection, Interviews and Job Offers

  • all candidates are selected for interview based solely on their skills, qualifications and experience.
  • all those who are involved in the recruitment process have been suitably trained to identify and assess the relevance and circumstances of offences and have received appropriate guidance and training in the relevant legislation relating to the employment of ex-offenders, e.g. the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974
  • Applicants will only be asked to provide details of convictions and cautions that Play Inclusion Project is legally entitled to know about. It will not request information about an applicant’s spent convictions and minor cautions (i.e. “protected” information)
  • All applicants will have ample opportunity, through open and measured discussion, to disclose details of previous “unprotected” convictions, offences or any other matter which may be relevant to the position. Failure to reveal information which is directly relevant to the position could lead to a withdrawal of any conditional offer.
  • Prospective volunteers will be given the opportunity to disclose information on a separate form and return it to the office in an envelope marked private – if they wish. Any other information that may improve understanding and ensure fair decision making may be attached.

 

  • Where a DBS check forms part of the recruitment process (because the post involves working with children and/or vulnerable adults) Play inclusion Project encourages all applicants called for interview to provide details of their criminal record at an early stage and before the DBS check is undertaken. This information will be treated in strictest confidence.
  • Play Inclusion Project will not refuse a candidate a conditional job offer, unless it is because a DBS check shows that they are unsuitable for that particular job. In this event, the matters revealed on the DBS certificate will be discussed with the candidate before the conditional offer of employment is withdrawn

Suitability of People with Criminal Records

The following is considered before making decisions about checking an applicants’ criminal record.

  • Roles within Play Inclusion Project involve 1:1 contact with children and vulnerable adults. These roles are exempt from the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 in accordance with the Rehabilitation of Offenders Act 1974 (Exceptions) Order 1975.
  • While roles within Play Inclusion Project are exempt under the ROA 1974, offences which are or would be filtered must be ignored.
  • Play Inclusion Project conducts DBS checks on all staff and volunteers. The check consists of an enhanced criminal record check, including searches of the child workforce barring list and/or adult workforce barring list where appropriate.
  • Staff and volunteers who work at Play Inclusion Project will be required to carry out tasks which are classes as regulated activity including personal care tasks.

Within the context of the above, the following are standing conditions for recruitment of people with a criminal record:

  • Applicants who have been barred from working with children or vulnerable adults will not be successful.
  • Applicants are given the opportunity to disclose offences at application. If an applicant fails to disclose offences during the application process which are later revealed by a criminal record check, they will not be successful.
  • Certain offences will always be considered relevant, i.e., offences not filtered by the Disclosure and Barring Service. Applicants with a history of violent or sexual offences, serious drug offences, and serious offences of dishonesty will not be successful.
  • Some members of staff are expected to drive as part of their duties. Driving offences may be considered relevant, and must be discussed prior to appointment.
  • Applicants whose criminal record disclosure reveals offences should expect to speak openly, frankly, and honestly regarding those offences with an officer or the member of staff involved in the recruitment process.

Assessing

Whilst Play Inclusion Project recognises that a history of offending does not constitute who a person is, and that people with a criminal record may bring valuable experience, safeguarding our service users, staff and volunteers is paramount. If criminal records are disclosed during recruitment, Play Inclusion Project will consider:

Relevance

  • whether offences have been, or if disclosed by the applicant should have been, filtered
  • whether those offences bar that person from working with vulnerable children and adults
  • Under schedule 4 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Service Act  2000 it is an offence to apply to be a volunteer working with under 18’s and for an organisation to take someone on as a volunteer working with under 18’s who is banned from working with people under 18. It is also an offense to apply to be a volunteer working with vulnerable adults and for an organisation to take someone on who is banned from working with vulnerable adults. If this occasion arises the Charity Manager will contact the local police for guidance.
  • Under the Protection of Children Act 1999 and the Criminal Justice and Court Service Act 2000 people banned from working with under 18’s and/or vulnerable adults are –
    1. Individuals on the Dfes List 99
    2. Individuals on the PoVA List
    3. Individuals on the PoCA List
    4. Individuals on the National Assembly of Wales List
    5. Individuals convicted of specified schedule 4 Offences

(a list of these can be obtained on request).

Seriousness

  • dishonesty/theft/larceny may include shoplifting, or violent burglary
  • violent offences may include affray or public disorder, or causing grievous bodily harm
  • criminal damage may include breaking into an empty building, or intentionally destroying property
  • sexual offences may include public urination, or rape or sexual assault
  • drug offences may include possession of Class B substances for example cannabis, or possession with intent to supply Class A substances such as heroin or cocaine
  • driving offences may include speeding, or causing death by dangerous driving.

Pattern

  • a number of offences committed over a longer period may indicate recidivism, particularly where those offences were committed within the last 3-5 years
  • most offending is circumstantial, and it is important to establish why that person was offending, and why they have ceased
  • the age at which offences were committed.

Attitude

  • whether the applicant accept responsibility for offending
  • whether the applicant express remorse regarding their offending
  • how the applicant views their offending in the context of their present role in work, and in society, and whether the applicant believes these experiences may be useful in their role.

Storage and access

Certificate information is never kept on an employee’s or volunteer’s personal file and is always kept separately and securely, by the Charity Manager, with access strictly controlled and limited to those who are entitled to see it as part of their duties. Play Inclusion Project maintains a record of all those who have applied for a DBS check and for whom certificates or certificate information has been revealed and we recognises that it is a criminal offence to pass this information to anyone who is not entitled to receive it.

Handling

In accordance with section 124 of the Police Act 1997, certificate information is only passed to those who are authorised to receive it in the course of their duties. Information on DBS Disclosures will be kept confidential and information will only be passed on to those authorised to receive it in the course of their duties. We recognise it is a criminal offence to pass it to anyone not entitled to receive it.

Usage

 

Certificate information is only used for the specific purpose for which it was requested and for which the applicant’s full consent has been given.

Retention

Play Inclusion Project will keep a photocopy of all employee and volunteer DBS certificates for 6 months, this is to allow for the consideration and resolution of any disputes or complaints. If in very exceptional circumstances it is considered necessary to keep the DBS Disclosure information longer than six months Play Inclusion Project will consult the DBS and give full consideration to Data Protection and the individuals Human Rights before doing so. The usual conditions of storage will apply.

If there are any documents relating to decisions following a DBS Disclosure being received with information detailed on it, they will be filed with the individuals DBS Disclosure and be stored, accessed and destroyed under the same conditions.

Disposal

Once the retention period has elapsed, Play Inclusion Project will ensure that any DBS certificate information is immediately destroyed by placing it in the Shred-It bin (further information can be found in the Shred-It Policy).  However, notwithstanding the above, Play Inclusion Project will keep a record of the date of issue of a certificate, the name of the individual and the unique reference number of the certificate.

 

 

A copy of the DBS Code of Practice can be downloaded from the DBS website or is available upon request

Restrictive Physical Interventions Policy

Policy Statement

Play Inclusion Project is committed to maintaining a safe working environment for all children, young people, staff and volunteers.   To fulfil this commitment a policy for behaviour management has been agreed.

This Physical Interventions Policy reflects the expectations of the Children’s Act 1989 and the Human Rights Act 1998, it is also consistent with the guidance provided by the DoH and DfES on this subjectThis policy compliments the Behaviour Policy and the two should be used in conjunction.

Principles

  • Children who lose control require help to regain control
  • The use of restrictive physical intervention is an act of care
  • Wherever possible, restrictive physical interventions should be used in a way that is sensitive to, and respects the cultural expectations of, children and service users and their attitudes towards physical contact
  • Any restrictive physical Intervention should avoid contact that might be misinterpreted as sexual
  • Restrictive physical interventions should always be designed to achieve outcomes that reflect the best interests of the child or young person whose behaviour is of immediate concern and others affected by the behaviour requiring intervention.
  • The decision to use a restrictive physical intervention must take account of the circumstances and be based upon an assessment of the risks associated with the intervention compared with the risks of not employing a restrictive physical intervention.
  • A restrictive physical intervention must also only employ a reasonable amount of force – that is the minimum force needed to avert injury or damage to property or applied for the shortest period of time
  • When force is used it will involve the least amount necessary for the minimum period of time to enable a child or young person to regain selfcontrol

Scope

Reasonable force can be used to prevent:

  • Crime
  • Harm to the child or young person or others
  • Damage to property
  • Seriously disruptive behaviour (including that which affects order with the scheme)

Restrictive physical interventions can be employed to achieve a number of different outcomes:

  •  to break away or disengage from dangerous or harmful physical contact initiated by a service user;
  • to separate the person from a ‘trigger’, for example, removing one child who responds to another with physical aggression;
  • to protect a child or young person from a dangerous situation – for example, the hazards of a busy road.

It is helpful to distinguish between:

  • planned intervention, in which staff employ, where necessary, pre-arranged strategies and methods which are based upon a risk assessment and are recorded in care plans
  • emergency or unplanned use of force which occurs in response to unforeseen events

Prevention

There is a stepped approach to prevention which begins with developing an ethos in which good behaviour is a reasonable expectation, proceeds to a number of stages of intervention to deal with signs of mounting anger and aggression and cumulates in the use of restrictive physical interventions only as a last resort.

The use of restrictive physical interventions should be minimised by the adoption of primary and secondary preventative strategies.

Primary prevention is achieved by:

  • ensuring that the number of staff and their level of competence corresponds to the needs of children and young people and the likelihood that physical interventions will be needed. Staff should not be left in vulnerable positions
  • helping children and young people to avoid situations which are known to provoke violent or aggressive behaviour,
  • completing care plans which are responsive to individual needs and include current information on risk assessment;
  • creating opportunities for children and young people to engage in meaningful activities which include opportunities for choice
  • developing staff expertise in working with children and young people who present challenging behaviours;
  • talking to children, young people, their families and advocates about the way in which they prefer to be managed when they pose a significant risk to themselves or others. Some children or young people prefer withdrawal to a quiet area to an intervention which involves bodily contact.

Secondary prevention involves recognising the early stages of a behavioural sequence that is likely to develop into violence or aggression and employing ‘defusion’ techniques to avert any further escalation.

Partnership

The importance of the role of parent/carers, school and staff is recognised in managing children and young people with challenging behaviour and we will work actively in partnership to promote acceptable behaviour in children and young people.

Risk Assessment

When the use of a restrictive physical Intervention is sanctioned, appropriate steps will be taken to minimise the risk to both staff and service users.

Among the main risks to children and young people are that a physical intervention could:

  • be used unnecessarily, that is when other less intrusive methods could achieve the desired outcome
  • cause injury
  • cause pain, distress or psychological trauma
  • become routine, rather than exceptional methods of management
  • increase the risk of abuse
  • undermine the dignity of the staff or service users or otherwise humiliate or degrade those involved
  • create distrust and undermine personal relationships.

The main risks to staff include the following:

  • as a result of applying a physical intervention they suffer injury
  • as a result of applying a physical intervention they experience distress or psychological trauma
  • the legal justification for the use of a physical intervention is challenged in the courts
  • disciplinary action.

The main risks of not intervening include:

  • staff may be in breach of the duty of care
  • children, service users, staff or other people will be injured or abused
  • serious damage to property will occur
  • the possibility of litigation in respect of these matters

Authorised Staff

The manager will authorise individuals who may be required to use physical intervention in the course of their duties.  Only trained staff will be authorised to use physical intervention techniques. These authorisations will be regularly reviewed.

Recording and monitoring

The use of a restrictive physical intervention, whether planned or unplanned (emergency) must be recorded as quickly as practicable (and in any event within 24 hours of the incident) by the person(s) involved.

The written record will include:

  • the names of the staff and service users involved
  •  the reason for using a physical intervention (rather than another strategy)
  • the type of physical intervention employed
  • the date and the duration of the physical intervention
  • whether the service user or anyone else experienced injury or distress and, if they did, what action was taken
  • Supervisors must ensure parents have been informed of any such incidents and sign the relevant paperwork accordingly

The views of the service user(s) involved in the incident will also be recorded where appropriate.

All incidents of restraint and other physical interventions will be recorded and regularly reviewed. Supervisors must ensure parents have been informed of any such incidents and sign the relevant paperwork accordingly.

Post Incident Management

Following an Incident in which restrictive physical interventions are employed, the staff members involved must ensure they take time out to regain their composure.

Staff, children and young people will be given separate opportunities to talk about what happened in a calm and safe environment.  Interviews will only take place when those involved have recovered their composure. Post incident interviews should be designed to discover exactly what happened and the effects on the participants.

They should not be used to apportion blame or to punish those involved.

If there is any reason to suspect that a child/young person or a member of staff has experienced injury or severe distress following the use of a physical intervention, they should receive prompt medical attention.

To help protect the interests of children and young people who are exposed to restrictive physical interventions Play Inclusion Project will involve, wherever possible, parents, carers and independent advocates in planning, monitoring and reviewing how and when they are used.

Complaints

All complaints, which arise through the use of physical interventions, will be taken seriously and investigated properly by the Charity Manager and Management Committee. Under no circumstances should children or young people or their parents take direct action against any member of staff.

Lost Child Policy

Policy Statement

The safety and wellbeing of children and young people is maintained as the highest priority.  Every attempt is made through following Play Inclusion Project’s policies and procedures to ensure the safety of children and young people.

Lost from the Setting

In the unlikely event of a child being lost from the venue or setting the following procedure should be followed:

  • The Activity Coordinator should be immediately informed and staff identified to search the surrounding area that the child was last seen, then the building followed by outside areas.
  • If the child is not found then the child’s parents should be alerted.
  • Information should be sought from other children in the group according to age and understanding.
  • A member of staff may be detailed to search outside the building if there is any information to suggest the child’s possible whereabouts or direction of travel.
  • Parents and Supervisor will liaise re calling the police.
  • If the child is not found after 15 minutes the police will be called.

Children Lost on an Outing

If a child is lost on an outing the member of staff noticing the child missing should alert all staff and the Activity Coordinator who should carry out a head count.

  • A member of staff or the whole group (if appropriate) should re trace their movements to the last place that the child was seen.
  • Another member of staff should alert the management of the venue/organisation being visited.
  • Children on the visit should be asked for any relevant information.
  • If the child is not found straightaway the Charity Manager should be informed and the child’s parents.
  • If the child is not found after 15 minutes then the police should be called.

Measures in place to ensure a child does not go missing

  • Entry to authorised/identified persons only.
  • Information to parents/carers and staff about challenging unknown persons on the premises and at the door.
  • Supervision of children at all times by appointed support worker/carer.
  • Sufficient staff to maintain ratio’s with back-up plan.

 

 

Trips to venues outside local area to be appropriately researched i.e. Eating/toileting facilities, access and suitability for age and appropriately staffed.